All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visual Research in the Social Sciences: Key elements of a taxonomic and methodological framework
Unformatted Document Text:  2 b. Scientific Expressiveness: pictures should not necessarily be used solely for their mimetic strength, but they can also be employed as means of conveying scientific insight, insofar as the specific expressive elements of the camera (framing, editing) are carefully exploited, to com- municate a way of looking at a certain social phenomenon and not to merely reflect it. c. Place/Role in Research Process: imagery can be used in a certain phase of the research pro- cess (to be reduced in words or numbers) or they may become an essential part of the end product (a visual essay, a film etc.) d. Field involvement: the process of image making may seek to involve (interaction/participation) the field of study to some degree or choose to keep a distance from it, resulting in quite different products. 2. Modes of Visual Research: a pragmatic typology 2.1 Analysing ’Societal’ Imagery The first criterion introduces the most clear distinction within the concrete modes of using imagery in social science: that between the social scientist as a ’collector of societal images’ and as ’producer or initiator of images’. Social scientists could indeed first and foremost take advantage of the wide sweep of visual data sources to be found in society. Notably family photography and advertising, - in many respects opposite areas - clearly exemplify what is to be gained from social scientific analysis of societal imagery. The two domains clearly offer insight into the specific social functions of their visual imagery and at the same time provide access to relevant aspects of society and culture at large. Up till now these particularly interesting fields have drawn extensive attention but many other areas and types of societal imagery are still to be explored. Next to collecting existing imagery from society, where the emphasis of research thus lies on the decoding of a secondary visual reality which is often not or no longer directly accessible, a number of key modes of camera use begin with the primary reality from which the social scientist selects events and phenomena to be visually recorded and processed as an intermediate phase in a research project or as a proper scientific end product. Thus we can distinguish a number of more or less distinct key modes of camera use within the social sciences, which each have different scientific functions and pretensions, be it that in reality these modes often amalgamate within the same product. 2.2 Systematic Camera Recording Techniques A first and very dominant and varied mode, which I tend label as a form of ’systematic camera recording techniques’, comprises all of the applications in which the camera is used as a mere recording device, thus relying primarily if not exclusively on its mimetic potential. The resulting

Authors: Pauwels, Luc.
first   previous   Page 2 of 11   next   last



background image
2
b. Scientific Expressiveness: pictures should not necessarily be used solely for their mimetic
strength, but they can also be employed as means of conveying scientific insight, insofar as the
specific expressive elements of the camera (framing, editing) are carefully exploited, to com-
municate a way of looking at a certain social phenomenon and not to merely reflect it.
c. Place/Role in Research Process: imagery can be used in a certain phase of the research pro-
cess (to be reduced in words or numbers) or they may become an essential part of the end
product (a visual essay, a film etc.)
d. Field involvement: the process of image making may seek to involve
(interaction/participation) the field of study to some degree or choose to keep a distance from it,
resulting in quite different products.
2. Modes of Visual Research: a pragmatic typology
2.1 Analysing ’Societal’ Imagery
The first criterion introduces the most clear distinction within the concrete modes of using
imagery in social science: that between the social scientist as a ’collector of societal images’
and as ’producer or initiator of images’. Social scientists could indeed first and foremost take
advantage of the wide sweep of visual data sources to be found in society. Notably family
photography and advertising, - in many respects opposite areas - clearly exemplify what is to be
gained from social scientific analysis of societal imagery. The two domains clearly offer insight
into the specific social functions of their visual imagery and at the same time provide access to
relevant aspects of society and culture at large. Up till now these particularly interesting fields
have drawn extensive attention but many other areas and types of societal imagery are still to
be explored.
Next to collecting existing imagery from society, where the emphasis of research thus lies on
the decoding of a secondary visual reality which is often not or no longer directly accessible, a
number of key modes of camera use begin with the primary reality from which the social
scientist selects events and phenomena to be visually recorded and processed as an
intermediate phase in a research project or as a proper scientific end product. Thus we can
distinguish a number of more or less distinct key modes of camera use within the social
sciences, which each have different scientific functions and pretensions, be it that in reality
these modes often amalgamate within the same product.
2.2 Systematic Camera Recording Techniques
A first and very dominant and varied mode, which I tend label as a form of ’systematic camera
recording techniques’, comprises all of the applications in which the camera is used as a mere
recording device, thus relying primarily if not exclusively on its mimetic potential. The resulting


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 11   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.