All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visual Research in the Social Sciences: Key elements of a taxonomic and methodological framework
Unformatted Document Text:  5 There is a growing need for the development of a visual methodology that, though based on classic methodology, fully accounts for the specifics of the image, offering insight into and control over the whole process that led to it, and involving a great number of choices, influences and circumstances during the set up, the gathering of data and the processing and presentation of visual data. Therefore I will make an attempt to find out how visual material with a high degree of scientific relevance and integrity can be obtained. To that aim four ’critical factors’ are put forward in order to determine the ways in which these factors can be optimised to obtain useful primary data or a scientifically edited product. The issues covered within each of the following factors make it clear that using a camera should never be regarded as a short cut to obtaining valuable data: using a camera gives rise to a number of specific problems of a tech- nical, methodological, psychological, epistemological, legal, and ethical nature. Furthermore it should be recognised that many aspects of social life are invisible to the camera’s and researcher’s eye, having no visual reference in observable behaviour or in the material world, and that therefore the camera can never become a ’catch all’ tool. 4.1. The theoretical foundation Exploring society with the camera requires thorough preparation and consideration with regard to the field and the subjects involved. An explicit and appropriate theory should guide the production and processing of images in all of its stages. Theory may direct our attention to things otherwise unnoticed or considered insignificant. Almost every choice has its epistemological implications. Researchers should be fully aware of these and should be able and willing to meticulously substantiate their decisions of a theoretical, methodological or technical nature in their reports. Selective gathering of visual data motivated by a clear vision is much more rewarding than hoping that the camera through extensive recordings, will automatically capture what afterwards will prove to be useful. In many visual projects a fruitful and ongoing exchange between theory and practise (data and experiences) occurs. 4.2. The level of visual competence The second critical factor to obtain useful imagery is a particular sort of visual competence. Researcher not only need to have a sufficient degree of technical knowledge, allowing them to produce images with enough visual detail, but they should also be aware of the conventions regarding the medium they are using, and consequently of the perceptual cultures of the academic or non-academic audience they intend to address. As image collectors, researchers should have at least a passive knowledge of the technical and expressive aspects of imagery in order to be able to adequately read them. In the analysis of societal imagery special attention should be paid to their historical context of production and

Authors: Pauwels, Luc.
first   previous   Page 5 of 11   next   last



background image
5
There is a growing need for the development of a visual methodology that, though based on
classic methodology, fully accounts for the specifics of the image, offering insight into and
control over the whole process that led to it, and involving a great number of choices, influences
and circumstances during the set up, the gathering of data and the processing and presentation
of visual data. Therefore I will make an attempt to find out how visual material with a high
degree of scientific relevance and integrity can be obtained. To that aim four ’critical factors’ are
put forward in order to determine the ways in which these factors can be optimised to obtain
useful primary data or a scientifically edited product. The issues covered within each of the
following factors make it clear that using a camera should never be regarded as a short cut to
obtaining valuable data: using a camera gives rise to a number of specific problems of a tech-
nical, methodological, psychological, epistemological, legal, and ethical nature. Furthermore it
should be recognised that many aspects of social life are invisible to the camera’s and
researcher’s eye, having no visual reference in observable behaviour or in the material world,
and that therefore the camera can never become a ’catch all’ tool.
4.1. The theoretical foundation
Exploring society with the camera requires thorough preparation and consideration with regard
to the field and the subjects involved. An explicit and appropriate theory should guide the
production and processing of images in all of its stages. Theory may direct our attention to
things otherwise unnoticed or considered insignificant.
Almost every choice has its epistemological implications. Researchers should be fully aware of
these and should be able and willing to meticulously substantiate their decisions of a theoretical,
methodological or technical nature in their reports.
Selective gathering of visual data motivated by a clear vision is much more rewarding than
hoping that the camera through extensive recordings, will automatically capture what afterwards
will prove to be useful.
In many visual projects a fruitful and ongoing exchange between theory and practise (data and
experiences) occurs.
4.2. The level of visual competence
The second critical factor to obtain useful imagery is a particular sort of visual competence.
Researcher not only need to have a sufficient degree of technical knowledge, allowing them to
produce images with enough visual detail, but they should also be aware of the conventions
regarding the medium they are using, and consequently of the perceptual cultures of the
academic or non-academic audience they intend to address.
As image collectors, researchers should have at least a passive knowledge of the technical and
expressive aspects of imagery in order to be able to adequately read them. In the analysis of
societal imagery special attention should be paid to their historical context of production and


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 11   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.