All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Asylum Politics, the Internet and the Public Sphere: UK Refugee Support Groups Online
Unformatted Document Text:  10 Addressing the Public of Refugees/Asylum Seekers This address covers (at least) three different groups: first, those who are overseas and may be planning to enter the UK, or who may already be in the UK, but are unsure of their legal status; second, those who are already in the UK and have either been granted asylum, or ‘leave to remain’; and third, the organised aspect of the above two groups of people, that is the associations and organisations representing the community of refugees/asylum seekers. The websites under study address all three groups subsumed here under the umbrella term of refugee public. First, the websites contain information of central importance to those who intend to immigrate or seek asylum in the UK. This is mainly information concerning the legal aspects of such a move, the conditions under which it may be successful, as well as advice as to how the move should be carried out. This information is not unique to the refugee support groups’ sites: indeed, the relevant government site, the Immigration and Nationality Directorate provides all the necessary legal information to those who plan to enter and stay in the UK, and a number of the refugee support groups’ sites provide a link to this government site. Nevertheless, the websites under study provide their own advice to those seeking entry, or seeking to legalise their status. Thus, the Immigration Advisory Service (IAS) have devoted a part of their website to ‘Advice’, where interested parties can get online advice on appeals, family settlement, visits, student and work applications, nationality, asylum, and so on. The Refugee Council provides ‘free online’ leaflets containing ‘essential information to asylum seekers and refugees’; similarly, the Asylum Aid website has a site containing downloadable ‘information for refugees and asylum seekers’. Of further interest here is that this information is offered in different languages: for instance, IAS has a link to the Bengali version of some of their information, and both Asylum Aid’s and the Refugee Council’s leaflets are available in several languages. More specifically targeted information and advice on seeking asylum is provided by the Stonewall Immigration Group (SIG), who campaign for “immigration rights for same sex couples and asylum seekers” – SIG has prepared a ‘briefing document’, “to help you identify and understand what is required to make a successful application (for asylum/immigration) under the Unmarried Partners Rule”. Alongside online advice, several websites offer a directory of solicitors specialising in immigration law, while some Web sites represent groups offering free advice and representation to asylum seekers. Problems concerning entry and legal status, however, constitute only part of the issues and problems faced by refugees in their quest for re-settlement. Other aspects of life of this marginalized group are often overlooked, and certain support groups (and their websites) attempt to redress this lack. Thus, some websites are also concerned with providing refugees with information concerning wider aspects of life; for instance, the World University Service UK has a programme on refugee education, and its website offers detailed information on this, including not only information on training and educational schemes, but also on employment opportunities. Refugees Online offers training in new technologies, details of which are found online, while it further supports websites set by refugee trainees. Other sites provide news and other information of interest to the refugee community. For instance, the RAM Project is concerned with the issue of refugees, asylum seekers and the mass media, and its online existence consists mainly in providing news bulletins of interest to the refugee community; here, one can find stories such as ‘First ID cards are issued’ as well as job offers (e.g. ‘Internship programme seeks African, Asian and Caribbean journalists’). In a similar vein, ‘New Vision’ is “an online publication by refugees for refugees … aimed at creating voice for the voiceless … It will inform the refugee community on current developments and issues relating to immigration, education,

Authors: Siapera, Eugenia.
first   previous   Page 10 of 16   next   last



background image
10
Addressing the Public of Refugees/Asylum Seekers
This address covers (at least) three different groups: first, those who are overseas and may be
planning to enter the UK, or who may already be in the UK, but are unsure of their legal status; second,
those who are already in the UK and have either been granted asylum, or ‘leave to remain’; and third,
the organised aspect of the above two groups of people, that is the associations and organisations
representing the community of refugees/asylum seekers. The websites under study address all three
groups subsumed here under the umbrella term of refugee public.
First, the websites contain information of central importance to those who intend to immigrate
or seek asylum in the UK. This is mainly information concerning the legal aspects of such a move, the
conditions under which it may be successful, as well as advice as to how the move should be carried
out. This information is not unique to the refugee support groups’ sites: indeed, the relevant
government site, the Immigration and Nationality Directorate provides all the necessary legal
information to those who plan to enter and stay in the UK, and a number of the refugee support groups’
sites provide a link to this government site. Nevertheless, the websites under study provide their own
advice to those seeking entry, or seeking to legalise their status. Thus, the Immigration Advisory
Service (IAS) have devoted a part of their website to ‘Advice’, where interested parties can get online
advice on appeals, family settlement, visits, student and work applications, nationality, asylum, and so
on. The Refugee Council provides ‘free online’ leaflets containing ‘essential information to asylum
seekers and refugees’; similarly, the Asylum Aid website has a site containing downloadable
‘information for refugees and asylum seekers’. Of further interest here is that this information is offered
in different languages: for instance, IAS has a link to the Bengali version of some of their information,
and both Asylum Aid’s and the Refugee Council’s leaflets are available in several languages. More
specifically targeted information and advice on seeking asylum is provided by the Stonewall
Immigration Group (SIG), who campaign for “immigration
rights for same sex couples and asylum
seekers”
– SIG has prepared a ‘briefing document’, “to help you identify and understand what is
required to make a successful application (for asylum/immigration) under the Unmarried Partners
Rule”. Alongside online advice, several websites offer a directory of solicitors specialising in
immigration law, while some Web sites represent groups offering free advice and representation to
asylum seekers.
Problems concerning entry and legal status, however, constitute only part of the issues and
problems faced by refugees in their quest for re-settlement. Other aspects of life of this marginalized
group are often overlooked, and certain support groups (and their websites) attempt to redress this
lack. Thus, some websites are also concerned with providing refugees with information concerning
wider aspects of life; for instance, the World University Service UK has a programme on refugee
education, and its website offers detailed information on this, including not only information on training
and educational schemes, but also on employment opportunities. Refugees Online offers training in
new technologies, details of which are found online, while it further supports websites set by refugee
trainees.
Other sites provide news and other information of interest to the refugee community. For
instance, the RAM Project is concerned with the issue of refugees, asylum seekers and the mass
media, and its online existence consists mainly in providing news bulletins of interest to the refugee
community; here, one can find stories such as ‘First ID cards are issued’ as well as job offers (e.g.
‘Internship programme seeks African, Asian and Caribbean journalists’). In a similar vein, ‘New Vision’
is “an online publication by refugees for refugees … aimed at creating voice for the voiceless … It will
inform the refugee community on current developments and issues relating to immigration, education,


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 16   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.