All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Freedom of Speech and Segmenting the Citizens
Unformatted Document Text:  ICA-10-10582 14 might induce curiosity about views and issues that a person would have otherwise ignored (p.31). Given the benefits of a diversified public sphere that is inclusive, we would expect that the media, as dominant actors within the public spheres, should be equally accessible, both in terms of providing access to information as well as in terms of providing access to means of self expressed (Dahlgreen, 2001, p.36). Unfortunately, the existing practices of surveillance and segmentation pose an important obstacle to the realization of this ideal public square. Gandy (2000) draws our attention to the probability that the use of segmentation based on profiles will aggravate existing disparities in education, income and access to informational resources 4 between groups in society (p.1100). He suggests that this outcome is likely because these segmentation schemes are used to facilitate the exclusion of people who have been identified as being less likely to support a particular view (Gandy, 2001, p.142). This process of exclusion becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy when those who have been deemed less likely to respond appropriately and hence excluded from the streams of information are most likely to be the people who need that information the most (p.156). These inequalities would, in his view, cause important distortions in the public sphere (Gandy, 2001, p.142) d) Exclusion and Loss of Trust As Putnam (2000) argues, one of the most important consequences of such exclusion is the loss of trust among those who have been excluded. Putnam demonstrates this tendency by showing that thin trust – the trust in generalized others as opposed to thick trust, which is trust in those whom a person knows well– was significantly lower among demographic groups that had been excluded (p.138). 4 At this point, it is important to notice that having access to informational resources is contingent upon many factors such as being able to afford the necessary technology (i.e Computers, Internet); being able to afford the fees charged by content providers; and having the intellectual resources that are necessary to make sense of an information.

Authors: Popescu, Mihaela. and Baruh, Lemi.
first   previous   Page 15 of 26   next   last



background image
ICA-10-10582
14
might induce curiosity about views and issues that a person would have otherwise ignored
(p.31).
Given the benefits of a diversified public sphere that is inclusive, we would expect
that the media, as dominant actors within the public spheres, should be equally accessible,
both in terms of providing access to information as well as in terms of providing access to
means of self expressed (Dahlgreen, 2001, p.36). Unfortunately, the existing practices of
surveillance and segmentation pose an important obstacle to the realization of this ideal
public square. Gandy (2000) draws our attention to the probability that the use of
segmentation based on profiles will aggravate existing disparities in education, income and
access to informational resources
4
between groups in society (p.1100). He suggests that this
outcome is likely because these segmentation schemes are used to facilitate the exclusion of
people who have been identified as being less likely to support a particular view (Gandy,
2001, p.142). This process of exclusion becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy when those who
have been deemed less likely to respond appropriately and hence excluded from the streams
of information are most likely to be the people who need that information the most (p.156).
These inequalities would, in his view, cause important distortions in the public sphere
(Gandy, 2001, p.142)
d) Exclusion and Loss of Trust
As Putnam (2000) argues, one of the most important consequences of such exclusion is
the loss of trust among those who have been excluded. Putnam demonstrates this tendency
by showing that thin trust – the trust in generalized others as opposed to thick trust, which is
trust in those whom a person knows well– was significantly lower among demographic
groups that had been excluded (p.138).
4
At this point, it is important to notice that having access to informational resources is contingent upon many
factors such as being able to afford the necessary technology (i.e Computers, Internet); being able to afford the
fees charged by content providers; and having
the intellectual resources that are necessary to make sense of an
information.


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 15 of 26   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.