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Freedom of Speech and Segmenting the Citizens
Unformatted Document Text:  ICA-10-10582 17 and develop the valuable conventions of interaction. Hence, the act of interaction would become the new interrupter of routine, at worst unwelcomed, at best an action desired but far from being accomplished. Sunstein (2001) also recognizes this possibility of the routinization of exclusion. According to him, “when opportunities are shut off, people may end up not wanting them at all” (p.111). The important point to notice is that the lack of demand, which follows the lack of supply, should not be a factor that justifies that very lack of supply (p.111). That is to say, the fact that the society lacks rights to privacy 6 and more importantly, that the society is not aware of the need for privacy rights should not be conceived as justification for the lack it. f) Segmentation and Polarization So far, in the preceding sections, the loss of trust among those who were excluded was explained with references to the processes through which individuals in certain segments lose their thin trust as a result of not being offered the opportunity to learn; the opportunity to associate with others; and the opportunity to engage in democratic deliberation. What was not explained up to this point is how the same segmentation practices of corporations also leads to polarization of groups. Despite my disagreements with Sunstein’s (2001) contention that in the long run markets will reduce the adverse effects of corporate manipulation (p.19), he does provide one of the most elaborate explorations of the ways in which segmentation and target marketing will lead to increased division within society. This process, named group polarization by both Turner (1991) and Sunstein (2001), can be defined as a process through which people move to accept and express more extreme views after deliberating with others who share similar perspectives. In other words, the increased segmentation of individuals which leads to their being engaged in discussions with people who share similar views, will move the 6 And lack of freedom of speech, lack of access to information, lack of freedom of association, lack of an all inclusive public sphere which are, according to this paper, partially caused by the lack of privacy

Authors: Popescu, Mihaela. and Baruh, Lemi.
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ICA-10-10582
17
and develop the valuable conventions of interaction. Hence, the act of interaction would
become the new interrupter of routine, at worst unwelcomed, at best an action desired but far
from being accomplished. Sunstein (2001) also recognizes this possibility of the
routinization of exclusion. According to him, “when opportunities are shut off, people may
end up not wanting them at all” (p.111). The important point to notice is that the lack of
demand, which follows the lack of supply, should not be a factor that justifies that very lack
of supply (p.111). That is to say, the fact that the society lacks rights to privacy
6
and more
importantly, that the society is not aware of the need for privacy rights should not be
conceived as justification for the lack it.
f) Segmentation and Polarization
So far, in the preceding sections, the loss of trust among those who were excluded
was explained with references to the processes through which individuals in certain segments
lose their thin trust as a result of not being offered the opportunity to learn; the opportunity to
associate with others; and the opportunity to engage in democratic deliberation. What was
not explained up to this point is how the same segmentation practices of corporations also
leads to polarization of groups.
Despite my disagreements with Sunstein’s (2001) contention that in the long run
markets will reduce the adverse effects of corporate manipulation (p.19), he does provide one
of the most elaborate explorations of the ways in which segmentation and target marketing
will lead to increased division within society. This process, named group polarization by
both Turner (1991) and Sunstein (2001), can be defined as a process through which people
move to accept and express more extreme views after deliberating with others who share
similar perspectives. In other words, the increased segmentation of individuals which leads
to their being engaged in discussions with people who share similar views, will move the
6
And lack of freedom of speech, lack of access to information, lack of freedom of association, lack of an all
inclusive public sphere which are, according to this paper, partially caused by the lack of privacy


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