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An Academic Accomplishment Index For Assessing Faculty Performance
Unformatted Document Text:  9 viewed as an important aspect of job performance when being reviewed for tenure and promotion (Visser, 2000). This finding may show continued support for the belief that teaching an online course a may be viewed as posing a "serious risk" to the advancement of faculty careers (Guernsey, 1997 ). These findings seem to suggest that junior faculty carefully consider investing time in developing online courses rather than engaging in traditional research. According to a 2001 survey, 84% of public universities offer some form of online instruction (Green, 2001). In universities where junior faculty are required to manage and teach an online course, their time may be better spent pursuing publications, grants and superior teaching evaluations. This may present particularly difficult stations where teaching evaluations from online instruction are not included as part of overall teaching evaluations (Young, 2002). Given the costs of developing, maintaining and teaching these courses one has to questions whether favorable teaching evaluations from online courses should be viewed differently than traditional course evaluations rather than leaving these activities to be discounted or ignored in evaluation summaries (Hattendorf Westney, 2000). Somewhat the same comment can be made about publishing one’s work in online media. Apparently, it has the same significance as giving a paper at a convention. When compared directly to print media publications, the administrators chose refereed articles in print nine times out of ten as being more meritorious than online publications. In spite of this finding, online publications are a new venue and as such should not be dismissed altogether. The principle concern of publishing in online media may be that the review standards are not as rigorous. Perhaps this perception is an appropriate check to prevent exasperating an emphasis on quantity of publications over quality of the work and the difficulty of the topic being investigated. Regardless, publishing online should not be dismissed entirely. The quality, reputation and rigor of these new publishing venues may become better established in time.

Authors: Adams, Jonathan.
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9
viewed as an important aspect of job performance when being reviewed for tenure and
promotion (Visser, 2000). This finding may show continued support for the belief that teaching
an online course a may be viewed as posing a "serious risk" to the advancement of faculty
careers (Guernsey, 1997 ).
These findings seem to suggest that junior faculty carefully consider investing time in
developing online courses rather than engaging in traditional research. According to a 2001
survey, 84% of public universities offer some form of online instruction (Green, 2001). In
universities where junior faculty are required to manage and teach an online course, their time
may be better spent pursuing publications, grants and superior teaching evaluations. This may
present particularly difficult stations where teaching evaluations from online instruction are not
included as part of overall teaching evaluations (Young, 2002). Given the costs of developing,
maintaining and teaching these courses one has to questions whether favorable teaching
evaluations from online courses should be viewed differently than traditional course evaluations
rather than leaving these activities to be discounted or ignored in evaluation summaries
(Hattendorf Westney, 2000).
Somewhat the same comment can be made about publishing one’s work in online media.
Apparently, it has the same significance as giving a paper at a convention. When compared
directly to print media publications, the administrators chose refereed articles in print nine times
out of ten as being more meritorious than online publications. In spite of this finding, online
publications are a new venue and as such should not be dismissed altogether.
The principle concern of publishing in online media may be that the review standards are
not as rigorous. Perhaps this perception is an appropriate check to prevent exasperating an
emphasis on quantity of publications over quality of the work and the difficulty of the topic
being investigated. Regardless, publishing online should not be dismissed entirely. The quality,
reputation and rigor of these new publishing venues may become better established in time.


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