All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Refocusing America: American Society Through the Camera's Lens, 1945-2000
Unformatted Document Text:  The newspaper was an amalgam of the textual and visual—each form utilized to best serve the journalistic organization and the `collective memory’ of the public. The Times’s increased predisposition to place visuals on its pages is revealed by the graph on page 23, plotting the number of visual images published on the front page of the first Tuesday of the month between 1945 and 2000. The once text-heavy, Wall Street Journal- resembling Times transformed into a better-integrated paper, effectively combining textual and visual elements. While between 1945 and 1959 the average number of images per year hovered around 18, by the 1980s the average had increased to over 40 images per year (see page 24). The shift in the content of visuals on the front page of the Times is plotted on page 25. Images falling under the categorization popular politics clearly dominated the Times’s front page prior to the early sixties. By 1962, however, a visible shift occurred in the nature of images, emphasizing more socially and culturally oriented subjects. This trend nonetheless did not persist throughout the remainder of the century. The 1970s was a period of flux—a period during which neither grouping clearly dominated the Times’s front page. But why? The answer rests in a confluence of factors—social, cultural, and political. Fluctuations witnessed throughout the 1970s reflect the repercussions of America’s social and cultural revolution, rooted in the developments of the late 1950s and 1960s. The data collected for the 1970s does not indicate an anomaly but rather the sensitivity of photojournalism to current events. As Bruce Schulman argues in his recent account of The Seventies, the period “witnessed declining faith in government programs-skepticism about large-scale public efforts to remake the world. Economic malaise and political crisis sent the welfare state into retreat and prompted new respect for capitalism throughout the industrialized world.” 16 America, as it had formerly been defined, underwent an identity crisis. Alternatives to the traditional public sphere were actively sought out. The `long’ 1970s, a decade Schulman defines as encompassing the first Reagan administration as well as the 1970s itself, was a period during which the United States “experienced a remarkable makeover. It’s economic outlook, 16 Bruce J Schulman The Seventies The Great Shift in American Culture Society and Politics Cambridge DaCapo Press xv

Authors: Maurantonio, Nicole.
first   previous   Page 10 of 29   next   last



background image
The newspaper was an amalgam of the textual and visual—each form utilized to best serve the
journalistic organization and the `collective memory’ of the public.
The
Times’s increased predisposition to place visuals on its pages is revealed by the graph on
page 23, plotting the number of visual images published on the front page of the first Tuesday of the
month between 1945 and 2000. The once text-heavy, Wall Street Journal- resembling Times transformed
into a better-integrated paper, effectively combining textual and visual elements. While between 1945 and
1959 the average number of images per year hovered around 18, by the 1980s the average had increased
to over 40 images per year (see page 24).
The shift in the content of visuals on the front page of the Times is plotted on page 25. Images
falling under the categorization popular politics clearly dominated the Times’s front page prior to the
early sixties. By 1962, however, a visible shift occurred in the nature of images, emphasizing more socially
and culturally oriented subjects. This trend nonetheless did not persist throughout the remainder of the
century. The 1970s was a period of flux—a period during which neither grouping clearly dominated the
Times’s front page. But why? The answer rests in a confluence of factors—social, cultural, and political.
Fluctuations witnessed throughout the 1970s reflect the repercussions of America’s social and cultural
revolution, rooted in the developments of the late 1950s and 1960s. The data collected for the 1970s does
not indicate an anomaly but rather the sensitivity of photojournalism to current events.
As Bruce Schulman argues in his recent account of The Seventies, the period “witnessed declining
faith in government programs-skepticism about large-scale public efforts to remake the world. Economic
malaise and political crisis sent the welfare state into retreat and prompted new respect for capitalism
throughout the industrialized world.”
16
America, as it had formerly been defined, underwent an identity
crisis. Alternatives to the traditional public sphere were actively sought out. The `long’ 1970s, a decade
Schulman defines as encompassing the first Reagan administration as well as the 1970s itself, was a
period during which the United States “experienced a remarkable makeover. It’s economic outlook,
16
Bruce J Schulman The Seventies The Great Shift in American Culture Society and Politics Cambridge
DaCapo Press
xv


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.