All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Refocusing America: American Society Through the Camera's Lens, 1945-2000
Unformatted Document Text:  While history has nonetheless tied the media and politics together, I would hesitate to claim the media have an explicit role in reinforcing democratic ideals. The `new,’ more interpretive journalism that emerged during the post-World War II period undoubtedly challenged political authority, as Woodward’s and Bernstein’s expose of the Watergate scandal revealed. Yet by no means did coverage of Watergate represent a departure from the media’s aims in presenting news. Watergate and other such scandals were the product of political failures, not the shortcomings of the media. Shifts in the nature of news coverage, however, resonated of an even more rudimentary transformation in the nature of American politics—the demise of the dual-party system. As a result of divisive issues dominating the political forum in the 1960s, issues articulated by members of `adversary culture,’ distinctions between the two major parties blurred. No longer serving the political sphere as an advocate of partisanship, the media was left to its own devices, as were political parties. Unfortunately, parties proved incapable of coping with prevailing transformations in society and culture. By inadequately articulating and representing the expectations of their constituents, political parties were challenged by their members. The rise of `adversary culture’ contributed to the decline of partisan affiliation permitting divisive issues such as crime, drugs, inflation, Vietnam, and race relations to command attention in what was once a sharply defined political sphere. Without coherent ideological positions around which its members could coalesce, parties failed to mobilize support. The electorate was divided, and politics was displaced. In failing to demarcate Republican from Democrat, parties ebbed in influence. The line between popular politics and what I have termed the `social’ and `cultural’ elements of society was obscured, generating widespread ambiguity and confusion. This is evidenced in the results of my research, revealing considerable fluctuation in the nature of photographs printed on the front page of the Times throughout the 1970s. While `popular politics’ is primarily dominated by the social/cultural during the 1960s, by the 1970s, when these transformations had fully formed, no consistent pattern revealed itself. The `political’ did not disappear. Rather, it was reconceptualized and redefined, appearing in a variety of forms.

Authors: Maurantonio, Nicole.
first   previous   Page 19 of 29   next   last



background image
While history has nonetheless tied the media and politics together, I would hesitate to claim the
media have an explicit role in reinforcing democratic ideals. The `new,’ more interpretive journalism that
emerged during the post-World War II period undoubtedly challenged political authority, as
Woodward’s and Bernstein’s expose of the Watergate scandal revealed. Yet by no means did coverage of
Watergate represent a departure from the media’s aims in presenting news. Watergate and other such
scandals were the product of political failures, not the shortcomings of the media. Shifts in the nature of
news coverage, however, resonated of an even more rudimentary transformation in the nature of
American politics—the demise of the dual-party system.
As a result of divisive issues dominating the political forum in the 1960s, issues articulated by
members of `adversary culture,’ distinctions between the two major parties blurred. No longer serving
the political sphere as an advocate of partisanship, the media was left to its own devices, as were political
parties. Unfortunately, parties proved incapable of coping with prevailing transformations in society and
culture. By inadequately articulating and representing the expectations of their constituents, political
parties were challenged by their members. The rise of `adversary culture’ contributed to the decline of
partisan affiliation permitting divisive issues such as crime, drugs, inflation, Vietnam, and race relations
to command attention in what was once a sharply defined political sphere. Without coherent ideological
positions around which its members could coalesce, parties failed to mobilize support. The electorate
was divided, and politics was displaced.
In failing to demarcate Republican from Democrat, parties ebbed in influence. The line between
popular politics and what I have termed the `social’ and `cultural’ elements of society was obscured,
generating widespread ambiguity and confusion. This is evidenced in the results of my research,
revealing considerable fluctuation in the nature of photographs printed on the front page of the Times
throughout the 1970s. While `popular politics’ is primarily dominated by the social/cultural during the
1960s, by the 1970s, when these transformations had fully formed, no consistent pattern revealed itself.
The `political’ did not disappear. Rather, it was reconceptualized and redefined, appearing in a variety of
forms.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 19 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.