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A Multilevel Study of Interpersonal Influence in Academic ‘Influence Networks’
Unformatted Document Text:  Influence Networks 23 The first pair of hypotheses was based on the expectation that individuals would be more motivated to comply with central individuals, but it is also reasonable to expect that central people will be less motivated to comply with others. The data does not support this relationship. In fact, the correlation between outdegree motivation to comply and Centrality 1 was significant but in the positive direction. This suggests that central individuals, while being perceived as influential (based on a relatively higher motivation to comply score), also tended to attribute influence to their connected others. An imbalance in the ratings for motivation to comply was expected, and the finding that central individuals are associated with both indegree and outdegree motivation to comply conflicts with the notion that power is defined a an unequal distribution of influence. As Bonacich puts it: “power comes from being connected to those who are powerless” (1987, p. 1171). This outcome directs attention to looking both ways when assessing influence. It is important to assess indegree influence, but it is also important to consider the proportion of this indegree influence to ratings of outdegree influence. These data indicate that central individuals do not necessarily rate their interactive counterparts as being less influential than themselves. This suggests that future research on the centrality-influence link should consider inward and outward interpersonal influence reports. The third pair of hypotheses tested the centrality-influence assumption within a multilevel model by using centrality as a predictor of attitude weights. This extends the notion of interpersonal influence to include behavioral intentions. Results indicate that both cross-level interactions did not offer a better fit of the data. Although received and reported influence is associated with central individuals at the level of self-reported motivation to comply with connected others, when placed ‘in competition’ with attitude weight relative to the formation of

Authors: Wolski, Stacy.
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Influence Networks 23
The first pair of hypotheses was based on the expectation that individuals would be more
motivated to comply with central individuals, but it is also reasonable to expect that central
people will be less motivated to comply with others. The data does not support this relationship.
In fact, the correlation between outdegree motivation to comply and Centrality
1
was significant
but in the positive direction. This suggests that central individuals, while being perceived as
influential (based on a relatively higher motivation to comply score), also tended to attribute
influence to their connected others.
An imbalance in the ratings for motivation to comply was expected, and the finding that
central individuals are associated with both indegree and outdegree motivation to comply
conflicts with the notion that power is defined a an unequal distribution of influence. As
Bonacich puts it: “power comes from being connected to those who are powerless” (1987, p.
1171). This outcome directs attention to looking both ways when assessing influence. It is
important to assess indegree influence, but it is also important to consider the proportion of this
indegree influence to ratings of outdegree influence. These data indicate that central individuals
do not necessarily rate their interactive counterparts as being less influential than themselves.
This suggests that future research on the centrality-influence link should consider inward and
outward interpersonal influence reports.
The third pair of hypotheses tested the centrality-influence assumption within a
multilevel model by using centrality as a predictor of attitude weights. This extends the notion
of interpersonal influence to include behavioral intentions. Results indicate that both cross-level
interactions did not offer a better fit of the data. Although received and reported influence is
associated with central individuals at the level of self-reported motivation to comply with
connected others, when placed ‘in competition’ with attitude weight relative to the formation of


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