All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Multilevel Study of Interpersonal Influence in Academic ‘Influence Networks’
Unformatted Document Text:  Influence Networks 24 behavioral intent, influence from connected others (the subjective norm) does not fare well when included in a model of behavioral intent. Implications for Current Theory These findings impact multilevel theories of social influence. Two theories that are impacted by these results are the structural theory of social influence and diffusion of innovations theory. Both of these theories assume that centrally located individuals within a social network possess influencing power over other networked individuals. The structural theory of social influence suggests that structural position determines the degree of influence an individual has within an influence network (Friedkin, 1998). In particular, the theory stipulates that central individuals are resistant to interpersonal influence and consequently are not susceptible to normative influence. Results indicate that Centrality 2 does not relate to received reports of likelihood to comply and that neither basis for centrality predicts attitude weight. The data show that attitudes predominate in the formation of behavioral intentions regardless of structural position: for all individuals surveyed in this study, the weights for attitude were consistently higher than the weights for subjective norm. The data from this study suggest that the weight for attitude does not vary according to structural centrality for the faculty included in this study and for the behavioral domain included in the survey, which raises some doubt about the system of influence that is proposed in the structural theory of social influence. Also, diffusion of innovations theory places great importance on the ‘opinion leaders’ within a diffusion context, suggesting that these central individuals wield influencing force that will lead to greater adoption within a network (Rogers, 1995). Opinion leaders may be associated with a high degree of motivation to comply among networked others, but the

Authors: Wolski, Stacy.
first   previous   Page 24 of 39   next   last



background image
Influence Networks 24
behavioral intent, influence from connected others (the subjective norm) does not fare well when
included in a model of behavioral intent.
Implications for Current Theory
These findings impact multilevel theories of social influence. Two theories that are
impacted by these results are the structural theory of social influence and diffusion of
innovations theory. Both of these theories assume that centrally located individuals within a
social network possess influencing power over other networked individuals.
The structural theory of social influence suggests that structural position determines the
degree of influence an individual has within an influence network (Friedkin, 1998). In
particular, the theory stipulates that central individuals are resistant to interpersonal influence
and consequently are not susceptible to normative influence. Results indicate that Centrality
2
does not relate to received reports of likelihood to comply and that neither basis for centrality
predicts attitude weight. The data show that attitudes predominate in the formation of behavioral
intentions regardless of structural position: for all individuals surveyed in this study, the weights
for attitude were consistently higher than the weights for subjective norm. The data from this
study suggest that the weight for attitude does not vary according to structural centrality for the
faculty included in this study and for the behavioral domain included in the survey, which raises
some doubt about the system of influence that is proposed in the structural theory of social
influence.
Also, diffusion of innovations theory places great importance on the ‘opinion leaders’
within a diffusion context, suggesting that these central individuals wield influencing force that
will lead to greater adoption within a network (Rogers, 1995). Opinion leaders may be
associated with a high degree of motivation to comply among networked others, but the


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 24 of 39   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.