All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Multilevel Study of Interpersonal Influence in Academic ‘Influence Networks’
Unformatted Document Text:  Influence Networks 7 are identified by their structural position of centrality, and they are labeled ‘opinion leaders’. The role of the opinion leader reflects the stipulation that structurally central individuals wield influence over interconnected others. This concept is based on the early work of Merton (1957), who identified key individuals within social contexts who are expected to exert influence (i.e., the influencing roles of locals and cosmopolites). Opinion leaders are identified by their network centrality, and the relationship between opinion leadership and interpersonal influence is an important element of the diffusion process. Based on the principle that “one cannot understand how actors come to hold particular opinions or behave in particular ways without taking the system of effects into account” (Friedkin, 1998, p. 34), the structural theory of social influence accounts for micro and macro level variables in the prediction of individual behavior (Friedkin, 1998). The structural theory of social influence situates behavioral decisions (micro level) within a decision context (macro level) that is described by network information. Interpersonal influence occurs over time and is based on a reciprocal influence process between an individual’s attitude and attitudes expressed within one’s normative environment. A formal relationship between centrality and influence is specified within this theory; central individuals are more resistant to interpersonal influence and peripheral individuals are susceptible to influence (Friedkin, 1998). The weights of self and other reflect an inverse relationship; a heavy weight on one component necessitates a light weight on the other. Structurally central individuals are labeled “heavyweights” because they are expected to weigh their self-weight (attitude) more heavily than individuals on the network periphery, and a “high self-weight precludes a flow of influence to the actor; hence, a heavily self-weighted actor (a

Authors: Wolski, Stacy.
first   previous   Page 7 of 39   next   last



background image
Influence Networks 7
are identified by their structural position of centrality, and they are labeled ‘opinion leaders’.
The role of the opinion leader reflects the stipulation that structurally central individuals wield
influence over interconnected others. This concept is based on the early work of Merton (1957),
who identified key individuals within social contexts who are expected to exert influence (i.e.,
the influencing roles of locals and cosmopolites). Opinion leaders are identified by their network
centrality, and the relationship between opinion leadership and interpersonal influence is an
important element of the diffusion process.
Based on the principle that “one cannot understand how actors come to hold particular
opinions or behave in particular ways without taking the system of effects into account”
(Friedkin, 1998, p. 34), the structural theory of social influence accounts for micro and macro
level variables in the prediction of individual behavior (Friedkin, 1998). The structural theory of
social influence situates behavioral decisions (micro level) within a decision context (macro
level) that is described by network information. Interpersonal influence occurs over time and is
based on a reciprocal influence process between an individual’s attitude and attitudes expressed
within one’s normative environment.
A formal relationship between centrality and influence is specified within this theory;
central individuals are more resistant to interpersonal influence and peripheral individuals are
susceptible to influence (Friedkin, 1998). The weights of self and other reflect an inverse
relationship; a heavy weight on one component necessitates a light weight on the other.
Structurally central individuals are labeled “heavyweights” because they are expected to weigh
their self-weight (attitude) more heavily than individuals on the network periphery, and a “high
self-weight precludes a flow of influence to the actor; hence, a heavily self-weighted actor (a


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 7 of 39   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.