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Building and Sustaining Intercultural Relationships: Public Perceptions and Practical Benefits of Friendships and Romantic Relationships in Intercultural Contexts
Unformatted Document Text:  Building and Sustaining Intercultural Relationships 12 interracial romantic relationships (Kouri & Lasswell, 1993; Mills, Daly, Longmore, & Kilbride, 1995). A study involving African Americans and European Americans indicated that family perception of romantic interracial relationships would be viewed as negative (Mills, Daly, Longmore, & Kilbride 1995). Findings show that “race, education level, and the degree of racially-based income inequality in a region significantly influence attitudes toward interracial marriages” (Yancy, 2001, p. 635). Dealing with pressures from both family and society is often a major factor in deciding whether to pursue romantic relations with a person from another culture. Research has revealed that African Americans have a more favorable attitude toward interracial romantic relationships than European Americans (Davidson & Schneider, 1992). It has also been found that more African Americans than European Americans believe that interracial relationships at any level are unacceptable to European Americans (Jarmon, 1980; Passet & Taylor, 1991; Todd, McKinney, Harris, Chadderton, & Small, 1992). Thus, African Americans are more open to interracial relationships but at the same time believe that European Americans do not favor such unions. Although interracial romantic relationships have a history of negativity, trends are changing. In general, more college students express a desire to date someone from another race than their own and do not rule out interracial marriage (Clark, 1986). Additionally, males have been found to have more interracial dating experiences than females (Clark, 1986). College students are more open to interracial marriages and intercultural relationships in general, because of their exposure to cultural diversity and their acknowledgement of other cultures in the college environment.

Authors: Docan, Tony.
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Building and Sustaining Intercultural Relationships 12
interracial romantic relationships (Kouri & Lasswell, 1993; Mills, Daly, Longmore, &
Kilbride, 1995). A study involving African Americans and European Americans
indicated that family perception of romantic interracial relationships would be viewed as
negative (Mills, Daly, Longmore, & Kilbride 1995). Findings show that “race, education
level, and the degree of racially-based income inequality in a region significantly
influence attitudes toward interracial marriages” (Yancy, 2001, p. 635). Dealing with
pressures from both family and society is often a major factor in deciding whether to
pursue romantic relations with a person from another culture.
Research has revealed that African Americans have a more favorable attitude
toward interracial romantic relationships than European Americans (Davidson &
Schneider, 1992). It has also been found that more African Americans than European
Americans believe that interracial relationships at any level are unacceptable to European
Americans (Jarmon, 1980; Passet & Taylor, 1991; Todd, McKinney, Harris, Chadderton,
& Small, 1992). Thus, African Americans are more open to interracial relationships but at
the same time believe that European Americans do not favor such unions.
Although interracial romantic relationships have a history of negativity, trends are
changing. In general, more college students express a desire to date someone from
another race than their own and do not rule out interracial marriage (Clark, 1986).
Additionally, males have been found to have more interracial dating experiences than
females (Clark, 1986). College students are more open to interracial marriages and
intercultural relationships in general, because of their exposure to cultural diversity and
their acknowledgement of other cultures in the college environment.


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