All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

'I'll Never Have a Clown in My House!' Frightening Movies and Enduring Emotional Memory
Unformatted Document Text:  Frightening Movies 14 are so grotesque and threatening that it is extremely difficult to counteract them with other forms of information (Cantor, 1998). Moreover, young children have difficulty understanding transformations (Flavell, 1963), and are especially troubled when a benign-looking character morphs into a grotesque one (Sparks & Cantor, 1986). These developmental considerations explain some of the problems young children have had with Poltergeist. They even explain, to some extent, young children’s reactions to Jaws before they are old enough to know that man-eating sharks can only be found in oceans. However, these issues do not help to explain the reactions of children over the age of eight to these movies, nor do they have any bearing on the enduring reactions of young adults. "It Could Happen" – Why Fictitious Events Are Scary Once we know that fictional movies are scripted by a screenwriter for the purpose of entertaining us, we still get scared by them for a variety of reasons. Certain visual images, such as attacking animals and physical deformities automatically arouse fear (e.g., Hall, 1897; Hebb, 1946), although adults often can quickly moderate their responses to them when we see them in movies. Humans are also naturally inclined to empathize with the emotions of protagonists, especially those that they like and admire (Zillmann & Cantor, 1977). Therefore, if the protagonists in a movie are intensely afraid or are threatened with harm, viewers often feel fear, too (Wilson & Cantor, 1985). Viewers also frequently adopt what has been called "the willing suspension of disbelief" in order to enjoy a more intense experience of a scary movie (Cantor, 2002). Moreover, accomplished filmmakers embellish their stories with such features as suspense, surprise, and scary music, which are designed to increase viewers’ fear (Cantor, 2002). These factors help explain why adults become frightened while watching fictional movies, but what about after the movie is over? Even if viewers care about the killer’s victims while watching Scream, once the movie is over and the lights are on, they should be reminded

Authors: Cantor, Joanne.
first   previous   Page 15 of 30   next   last



background image
Frightening Movies
14
are so grotesque and threatening that it is extremely difficult to counteract them with other forms
of information (Cantor, 1998). Moreover, young children have difficulty understanding
transformations (Flavell, 1963), and are especially troubled when a benign-looking character
morphs into a grotesque one (Sparks & Cantor, 1986).
These developmental considerations explain some of the problems young children have
had with Poltergeist. They even explain, to some extent, young children’s reactions to Jaws
before they are old enough to know that man-eating sharks can only be found in oceans.
However, these issues do not help to explain the reactions of children over the age of eight to
these movies, nor do they have any bearing on the enduring reactions of young adults.
"It Could Happen" – Why Fictitious Events Are Scary
Once we know that fictional movies are scripted by a screenwriter for the purpose of
entertaining us, we still get scared by them for a variety of reasons. Certain visual images, such
as attacking animals and physical deformities automatically arouse fear (e.g., Hall, 1897; Hebb,
1946), although adults often can quickly moderate their responses to them when we see them in
movies. Humans are also naturally inclined to empathize with the emotions of protagonists,
especially those that they like and admire (Zillmann & Cantor, 1977). Therefore, if the
protagonists in a movie are intensely afraid or are threatened with harm, viewers often feel fear,
too (Wilson & Cantor, 1985). Viewers also frequently adopt what has been called "the willing
suspension of disbelief" in order to enjoy a more intense experience of a scary movie (Cantor,
2002). Moreover, accomplished filmmakers embellish their stories with such features as
suspense, surprise, and scary music, which are designed to increase viewers’ fear (Cantor, 2002).
These factors help explain why adults become frightened while watching fictional
movies, but what about after the movie is over? Even if viewers care about the killer’s victims
while watching Scream, once the movie is over and the lights are on, they should be reminded


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 15 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.