All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Longitudinal Study Examining The Priming Effects of Music on Driving Anger, State Anger, and Negative-Valence Thoughts
Unformatted Document Text:  Violent Music 4 Cognitive Neo-associationistic Model Berkowitz’s (1993) cognitive neo-associationistic model assumes any emotional state is best regarded as an association network featuring feelings, physiological reactions, motor responses, thoughts, and memories. Despite being interconnected, this association network is not a tightly knit package. The linkages tying the differing components of the network vary in strength. For instance, when an individual experiences anger, this emotion might activate a large number of thoughts while simultaneously activating few memories. Despite not being a tightly knit package, Berkowitz (1993) postulates that an activation of a component within the network activates other components to some degree. The model begins with the emergence of an aversive event (e.g., being cut off by another driver). Immediately following the event, basic and automatic associative processes dominate. In the instance of being cut off by another driver, one might respond in shock or surprise by the event. Complex cognitive thoughts have little influence at the negative affect level despite being defined as unpleasant (Berkowitz, 1993). This initial response leads the provoked individual towards both aggressive and escape-related tendencies. Aggressive-related tendencies produce physiological changes (i.e., grit your teeth), feelings (i.e., anger), memories (i.e., the last time provoked by a driver), and motor responses (i.e., should I honk my horn?) associated with anger and aggression. On the contrary, escape-related tendencies differ from the aforementioned responses by producing physiological reactions, feelings, thoughts, memories, and motor responses linked with escaping from the aversive event rather than aggressing. Berkowitz (1993) promulgates that aversive incidents give rise to both tendencies.

Authors: Quick, Brian.
first   previous   Page 4 of 33   next   last



background image
Violent Music
4
Cognitive Neo-associationistic Model
Berkowitz’s (1993) cognitive neo-associationistic model assumes any emotional
state is best regarded as an association network featuring feelings, physiological
reactions, motor responses, thoughts, and memories. Despite being interconnected, this
association network is not a tightly knit package. The linkages tying the differing
components of the network vary in strength. For instance, when an individual experiences
anger, this emotion might activate a large number of thoughts while simultaneously
activating few memories. Despite not being a tightly knit package, Berkowitz (1993)
postulates that an activation of a component within the network activates other
components to some degree.
The model begins with the emergence of an aversive event (e.g., being cut off by
another driver). Immediately following the event, basic and automatic associative
processes dominate. In the instance of being cut off by another driver, one might respond
in shock or surprise by the event. Complex cognitive thoughts have little influence at the
negative affect level despite being defined as unpleasant (Berkowitz, 1993). This initial
response leads the provoked individual towards both aggressive and escape-related
tendencies. Aggressive-related tendencies produce physiological changes (i.e., grit your
teeth), feelings (i.e., anger), memories (i.e., the last time provoked by a driver), and motor
responses (i.e., should I honk my horn?) associated with anger and aggression. On the
contrary, escape-related tendencies differ from the aforementioned responses by
producing physiological reactions, feelings, thoughts, memories, and motor responses
linked with escaping from the aversive event rather than aggressing. Berkowitz (1993)
promulgates that aversive incidents give rise to both tendencies.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.