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A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression
Unformatted Document Text:  A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression Page 10 of 23 Confluence Model Risk Scores 9.00 6.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 1.00 M e a n S e x u a l A g g re s s io n 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 .5 Porn Consumption Low Med. High into 3 levels each by separating them into those scoring in the lowest 25% of the distribution, the middle 50%, and the top 25%. Cases in the lower quartile were assigned a 1; cases in the 25 th to 75 th percentile range were assigned a 2, and cases in the upper quartile were assigned a 3. Computing the product of the HM and IS scores yielded six levels of risk scores (1,2,3,4,6, or 9). Pornography consumption scores were divided at the median and the 75 th percentile such that scores below the median were assigned a 0, scores in the range of the 50 th and 75 th percentiles were assigned a 1, and scores above the 75 th percentile were assigned a 2. An ANOVA was conducted to test for interaction effects between the 6-level Confluence Model “risk variable” and the three levels of pornography consumption. A one-way analysis of variance yielded significant main effects for both the Risk Score variable, F = 2.984, p < 0.05 (Eta squared = 0.149), and Pornography Use, F = 4.809, p < 0.05 (Eta squared = 0.102). The interaction between these two variables F = 1.734, p = .094 (Eta squared = 0.155) occurred in the predicted direction, but was not significant. Figure 2 shows the mean levels of sexual aggression for each of the cells used in this analysis. In keeping with a moderator approach suggested by the findings of laboratory studies, the data indicated that at the lower levels of risk, there was relatively little difference in the levels of sexual aggression according to levels of pornography consumption. The average SES scores for the four low risk levels ranked from 1.0 (no sexual aggression) to 1.2. In contrast, at the moderate risk level (i.e., 6), the mean scores of sexual aggression ranged from 1.2 (N = 12), for those indicating never reading sexually explicit magazines, to 1.7 (N = 10), for those who frequently used such magazines. At the highest risk level (i.e. 9), men who indicated that they very frequently used pornography (M = 2.5, N =3) displayed the highest mean level of sexual aggression. It is this group that appears primarily responsible for the interaction effect, suggesting an increased risk of sexual aggression when a high Confluence Model risk score is combined with high pornography consumption. To statistically compare the effects within the various risk levels, follow-up analyses were conducted. Analyses were conducted separately within the low risk group (levels 1-4), and within the moderate to high-risk group (level 6 and 9). An ANOVA conducted within the combined low risk groups yielded no significant main effects, (F = 0.949, p = 0.496, Eta Squared = 0.141). In the higher-level risk group (6 & 9), an ANOVA yielded a significant main effect of Pornography Consumption, (F = 4.869, p <0.05, Eta Squared = 0.265.). The risk variable and the interaction term were both insignificant. Post hoc comparisons using Tukey HSD test showed that the high Figure 2. The interaction between Confluence Model Risk Score and Pornography Consumption.

Authors: vega, vanessa. and Malamuth, Neil.
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background image
A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression
Page 10 of 23
Confluence Model Risk Scores
9.00
6.00
4.00
3.00
2.00
1.00
M
e
a
n
S
e
x
u
a
l
A
g
g
r
e
s
s
i
o
n
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
.5
Porn Consumption
Low
Med.
High
into 3 levels each by separating
them into those scoring in the
lowest 25% of the distribution, the
middle 50%, and the top 25%.
Cases in the lower quartile were
assigned a 1; cases in the 25
th
to
75
th
percentile range were assigned
a 2, and cases in the upper quartile
were assigned a 3. Computing the
product of the HM and IS scores
yielded six levels of risk scores
(1,2,3,4,6, or 9). Pornography
consumption scores were divided
at the median and the 75
th
percentile such that scores below
the median were assigned a 0,
scores in the range of the 50
th
and 75
th
percentiles were assigned a 1, and scores above the
75
th
percentile were assigned a 2. An ANOVA was conducted to test for interaction
effects between the 6-level Confluence Model “risk variable” and the three levels of
pornography consumption.
A one-way analysis of variance yielded significant main effects for both the Risk
Score variable, F = 2.984, p < 0.05 (Eta squared = 0.149), and Pornography Use, F =
4.809, p < 0.05 (Eta squared = 0.102). The interaction between these two variables F =
1.734, p = .094 (Eta squared = 0.155) occurred in the predicted direction, but was not
significant. Figure 2 shows the mean levels of sexual aggression for each of the cells
used in this analysis. In keeping with a moderator approach suggested by the findings of
laboratory studies, the data indicated that at the lower levels of risk, there was relatively
little difference in the levels of sexual aggression according to levels of pornography
consumption. The average SES scores for the four low risk levels ranked from 1.0 (no
sexual aggression) to 1.2. In contrast, at the moderate risk level (i.e., 6), the mean scores
of sexual aggression ranged from 1.2 (N = 12), for those indicating never reading
sexually explicit magazines, to 1.7 (N = 10), for those who frequently used such
magazines. At the highest risk level (i.e. 9), men who indicated that they very frequently
used pornography (M = 2.5, N =3) displayed the highest mean level of sexual aggression.
It is this group that appears primarily responsible for the interaction effect, suggesting an
increased risk of sexual aggression when a high Confluence Model risk score is
combined with high pornography consumption.
To statistically compare the effects within the various risk levels, follow-up
analyses were conducted. Analyses were conducted separately within the low risk group
(levels 1-4), and within the moderate to high-risk group (level 6 and 9). An ANOVA
conducted within the combined low risk groups yielded no significant main effects, (F =
0.949, p = 0.496, Eta Squared = 0.141). In the higher-level risk group (6 & 9), an
ANOVA yielded a significant main effect of Pornography Consumption, (F = 4.869, p <
0.05, Eta Squared = 0.265.). The risk variable and the interaction term were both
insignificant. Post hoc comparisons using Tukey HSD test showed that the high
Figure 2. The interaction between Confluence Model Risk
Score and Pornography Consumption.


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