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A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression
Unformatted Document Text:  A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression Page 11 of 23 pornography group was significantly different in sexual aggression from the low pornography group (p < 0.05), but none of the other comparisons reached significance. Structural equation analyses Based on the hypothesis that the pornography consumption variable interacts with high Confluence Model risk scores to produce higher mean rates of sexual aggression, two initial models of sexual aggression were generated and compared using the Amos program. Parameter estimates were based on maximum likelihood estimation. To produce a more parsimonious appearance, latent constructs were created by summing the z-scores of manifest variables. In addition to hypothesized paths, relevant direct or indirect paths were tested and minor changes were made when they made theoretical sense (e.g. adding a correlational or bi-directional path between Impersonal Sexuality and Hostile Masculinity). Insignificant paths and factors that did not contribute significantly to sexual aggression were deleted from the model, (e.g. the path from Impersonal Sexuality to Sexual Aggression was not significant). Results of the analysis indicated that the model fit the data well, ( ² [2, N = 102] = 3.464, p >.10, NFI = 0.98, TLI = .97, CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.00). As can be seen in Figure 3, the Confluence Model accounted for 28% of the variance in the outcome variable of sexual aggression. The HM-IS interaction has a direct influence on sexual aggression, ( = 0.53, p < 0.05). However, the interaction term was only significant when a direct path from Hostile Masculinity to sexual aggression was removed. Due to the weak power of the IS term, the HM term accounts for most of the direct effects in a model where HM, IS and the interaction are the only terms. Thus, a .72 HMXIS .28 Sexual Aggression e4 e5 Impersonal Sexuality Hostile Masculinity .53 .09 .81 .31 Figure 3. The Confluence Model. Note: Correlations are significant at p < .05 .28 HM x IS x MX .44 Sexual Aggression e4 e5 Impersonal Sexuality Hostile Masculinity Sexually Explicit Media .20 .35 .04 .45 .39 .31 .27 .44 Figure 4. The Confluence Model-Pornography Consumption Interaction. Note: Correlations are significant at p < .05

Authors: vega, vanessa. and Malamuth, Neil.
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A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression
Page 11 of 23
pornography group was significantly different in sexual aggression from the low
pornography group (p < 0.05), but none of the other comparisons reached significance.
Structural equation analyses

Based on the hypothesis that the
pornography consumption variable
interacts with high Confluence
Model risk scores to produce
higher mean rates of sexual
aggression, two initial models of
sexual aggression were generated
and compared using the Amos
program. Parameter estimates
were based on maximum likelihood
estimation. To produce a more
parsimonious appearance, latent
constructs were created by
summing the z-scores of manifest
variables. In addition to
hypothesized paths, relevant direct
or indirect paths were tested and
minor changes were made when
they made theoretical sense (e.g.
adding a correlational or bi-
directional path between
Impersonal Sexuality and Hostile
Masculinity). Insignificant paths
and factors that did not contribute
significantly to sexual aggression
were deleted from the model, (e.g.
the path from Impersonal Sexuality
to Sexual Aggression was not
significant). Results of the analysis
indicated that the model fit the data
well, ( ² [2, N = 102] = 3.464, p >
.10, NFI = 0.98, TLI = .97, CFI =
0.99, RMSEA = 0.00). As can be
seen in Figure 3, the Confluence
Model accounted for 28% of the
variance in the outcome variable of sexual aggression. The HM-IS interaction has a
direct influence on sexual aggression, ( = 0.53, p < 0.05). However, the interaction term
was only significant when a direct path from Hostile Masculinity to sexual aggression
was removed.
Due to the weak power of the IS term, the HM term accounts for most of the
direct effects in a model where HM, IS and the interaction are the only terms. Thus, a
.72
HMXIS
.28
Sexual Aggression
e4
e5
Impersonal Sexuality
Hostile Masculinity
.53
.09
.81
.31
Figure 3. The Confluence Model. Note: Correlations are
significant at p < .05
.28
HM x IS x MX
.44
Sexual Aggression
e4
e5
Impersonal Sexuality
Hostile Masculinity
Sexually Explicit Media
.20
.35
.04
.45
.39
.31
.27
.44
Figure 4. The Confluence Model-Pornography Consumption
Interaction. Note: Correlations are significant at p < .05


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