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A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression
Unformatted Document Text:  A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression Page 12 of 23 direct path from Hostile Masculinity to Sexual Aggression significantly weakens the power of the interaction term because they are attempting to account for the same variance. Since the subsequent models that we are about to describe add the variable of pornography to the interaction term, and the pornography variable accounts for a significant portion in the three-way interaction, the direct path from Hostile Masculinity to sexual aggression counts as a significantly different path, and was thus retained. The model which included the pornography consumption-Confluence Model interaction fit the data well, ( ² [2, N = 102] = 3.145, p > .20, NFI = 0.976, TLI = 0.952, CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.075), and accounted for 44% of the variance in the outcome variable. The parameters and standardized coefficients of this model are presented in Figure 4. As can be seen in Figure 4, Hostile Masculinity ( = 0.35, p < 0.05) and the interaction term “HM x IS x MX,” ( = 0.44, p < 0.01), (i.e. the product of the Hostile Masculinity, Impersonal Sexuality, and Pornography Consumption scores), were both found to predict sexual aggression directly. Sexually Explicit Media showed an indirect effect on sexual aggression ( = 0.17, p < 0.05) through its influence on the interaction term. Impersonal Sexuality did not have any significant direct influence on sexual aggression ( = 0.00, P > 0.05) or the 3-way interaction term ( = 0.04, p > 0.05). General Hostility Based on previous research that has corroborated a relationship between sexual aggression and certain general personality characteristics, namely empathy, irritability, emotional susceptibility, and grandiosity/callousness/arrogance, we sought to model and test a further developed construct of “general hostility” that incorporates these items. The final path analysis, shown in Figure 4, provided a reasonable fit to the data ( ² [15, N = 102] = 19.902, p >.10, NFI = 0.903, TLI = 0.949, and RMSEA = 0.057, CFI = 0.972). In Figure 5, Hostile Masculinity and the 3-way interaction term, (the product of the Confluence Model factors and the Sexually Explicit Media variable), were both found to predict sexual aggression directly, ( = 0.35, p < 0.05; = 0.45, p < 0.01). A direct path from Impersonal Sexuality to Sexual Aggression was not significant (P > 0.05), and thus was eliminated. Negative Masculinity, Empathy and Irritability all evidenced significant and direct influence on the General Hostility construct, ( = 0.81, p < 0.01; = -0.41, p < .27 HM x IS x MX .44 Sexual Aggression e4 e5 Impersonal Sexuality .37 Hostile Masculinity e3 Sexually Explicit Media .20 GeneralHostility .23 IRR e6 .48 .17 EC e7 -.41 .65 M- e8 .81 .45 .39 .22 .31 .26 .28 .35 .61 .04 Figure 5. Hierarchical-mediational version of the Confluence Model. Note: Correlations are significant at p < .05, except MediaX and IS, (P = 0.09).

Authors: vega, vanessa. and Malamuth, Neil.
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A Mediational-Hierarchical Model of Sexual Aggression
Page 12 of 23
direct path from Hostile Masculinity to Sexual Aggression significantly weakens the
power of the interaction term because they are attempting to account for the same
variance. Since the subsequent models that we are about to describe add the variable of
pornography to the interaction term, and the pornography variable accounts for a
significant portion in the three-way interaction, the direct path from Hostile Masculinity
to sexual aggression counts as a significantly different path, and was thus retained.
The model which included the pornography consumption-Confluence Model
interaction fit the data well, ( ² [2, N = 102] = 3.145, p > .20, NFI = 0.976, TLI = 0.952,
CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.075), and accounted for 44% of the variance in the outcome
variable. The parameters and standardized coefficients of this model are presented in
Figure 4. As can be seen in Figure 4, Hostile Masculinity ( = 0.35, p < 0.05) and the
interaction term “HM x IS x MX,” ( = 0.44, p < 0.01), (i.e. the product of the Hostile
Masculinity, Impersonal Sexuality, and Pornography Consumption scores), were both
found to predict sexual aggression directly. Sexually Explicit Media showed an indirect
effect on sexual aggression ( = 0.17, p < 0.05) through its influence on the interaction
term. Impersonal Sexuality did not have any significant direct influence on sexual
aggression ( = 0.00, P > 0.05) or the 3-way interaction term ( = 0.04, p > 0.05).

General Hostility

Based on previous research that has
corroborated a relationship between
sexual aggression and certain
general personality characteristics,
namely empathy, irritability,
emotional susceptibility, and
grandiosity/callousness/arrogance,
we sought to model and test a
further developed construct of
“general hostility” that incorporates
these items. The final path analysis,
shown in Figure 4, provided a
reasonable fit to the data ( ² [15, N
= 102] = 19.902, p >.10, NFI =
0.903, TLI = 0.949, and RMSEA =
0.057, CFI = 0.972).
In Figure 5, Hostile
Masculinity and the 3-way
interaction term, (the product of the
Confluence Model factors and the
Sexually Explicit Media variable),
were both found to predict sexual
aggression directly, (
= 0.35, p < 0.05;
= 0.45, p < 0.01). A direct path from
Impersonal Sexuality to Sexual Aggression was not significant (P > 0.05), and thus was
eliminated. Negative Masculinity, Empathy and Irritability all evidenced significant and
direct influence on the General Hostility construct, ( = 0.81, p < 0.01;
= -0.41, p <
.27
HM x IS x MX
.44
Sexual Aggression
e4
e5
Impersonal Sexuality
.37
Hostile Masculinity
e3
Sexually Explicit Media
.20
General
Hostility
.23
IRR
e6
.48
.17
EC
e7
-.41
.65
M-
e8
.81
.45
.39
.22
.31
.26
.28
.35
.61
.04
Figure 5. Hierarchical-mediational version of the Confluence
Model. Note: Correlations are significant at p < .05, except
MediaX and IS, (P = 0.09).


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