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Hot call to a warm line: Preliminary explorations into doing suicide prevention
Unformatted Document Text:  13 466 DH: Uhm: (3.2) wh- (0.6) well it’s very important that you speak to a your 467 doctor about this 468 (0.6) 469 C: I mean ‘n that- that’s how depressed I get 470 DH: Mm hmm 471 C: .Hhh I Do take accenden which is a anti-depressant when I first took it 472 dahm, (0.2) twelve years- uhh fifteen years ago[, I was taking four one= 473 DH: [mhm 474 C: =hundred milligrams a night .hh and now I only take ah two milligram- 475 two hundred milligrams a night (0.3) . . . While still being ambiguous about the frequency and urgency of the problem (“there are times”), the caller reports on a very specific plan of action; this is a significant and common sign that a person might be seriously considering suicide. After a brief pause, DH responds to this report on a plan for suicide by seeking information. “Do you have a doctor” also incorporates a solution within the query: have a “doctor” (i.e., psychiatrist) deal with this. The working peer goes safe, first, by suggesting a professional, and hopefully being able to support that professional’s recommendations. The working peer, however, could only find out about these recommendations from the caller herself. Deferring to a professional and/or a professional’s recommendation was a common method used by warm line workers in urgent situations (see X, forthcoming). Once the caller confirms that she does have professional support, the working peer seeks a follow up report, in line 462, as to whether this professional is aware of her condition. The caller’s disconfirmation shifts responsibility to the working peer for solving her problem, as he perhaps is the only witness to her suicidal plan. As part of his pursuit of a solution, DH guesses at a possible justification for not doing the suggested action asked about in 462. This guessing is a good way to elicit concerns from the caller, as a way of gathering information about possible objections to what the expected advice should be. Because working peers are not only problem solvers but also taught to be

Authors: Pudlinski, Christopher.
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13
466
DH:
Uhm: (3.2) wh- (0.6) well it’s very important that you speak to a your
467
doctor about this
468
(0.6)
469
C: I mean ‘n that- that’s how depressed I get
470
DH: Mm
hmm
471
C: .Hhh I Do take accenden which is a anti-depressant when I first took it
472
dahm, (0.2) twelve years- uhh fifteen years ago[, I was taking four one=
473
DH:
[mhm
474
C: =hundred milligrams a night .hh and now I only take ah two milligram-
475
two hundred milligrams a night (0.3) . . .
While still being ambiguous about the frequency and urgency of the problem (“there are
times”), the caller reports on a very specific plan of action; this is a significant and common sign
that a person might be seriously considering suicide. After a brief pause, DH responds to this
report on a plan for suicide by seeking information. “Do you have a doctor” also incorporates a
solution within the query: have a “doctor” (i.e., psychiatrist) deal with this. The working peer
goes safe, first, by suggesting a professional, and hopefully being able to support that
professional’s recommendations. The working peer, however, could only find out about these
recommendations from the caller herself. Deferring to a professional and/or a professional’s
recommendation was a common method used by warm line workers in urgent situations (see X,
forthcoming). Once the caller confirms that she does have professional support, the working
peer seeks a follow up report, in line 462, as to whether this professional is aware of her
condition. The caller’s disconfirmation shifts responsibility to the working peer for solving her
problem, as he perhaps is the only witness to her suicidal plan.
As part of his pursuit of a solution, DH guesses at a possible justification for not doing
the suggested action asked about in 462. This guessing is a good way to elicit concerns from the
caller, as a way of gathering information about possible objections to what the expected advice
should be. Because working peers are not only problem solvers but also taught to be


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