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Hot call to a warm line: Preliminary explorations into doing suicide prevention
Unformatted Document Text:  15 currently relevant or solvable trouble. This re-frames her earlier statement as only a report to prove a point as to how depressed she gets. “That’s how depressed I get” characterizes her earlier report as an example not a current trouble; this makes irrelevant the working peer’s urgency to solve it. As such, the caller avoids responding to the suggested solution. In turn, the caller in line 471 continues with her “illustration”: reporting on a current action, taking medication, that demonstrates her progress over time, starting with when she “first” took it (in 471-472) and contrasting to “now” (in 473), and providing a summary assessment of this progress over time in 474 (“I have come down”), so as to imply that she is less depressed now. Her logic: if I am taking less anti-depressant medication now, the doctor must think I am less depressed. Perhaps if she told her doctor about her suicidal plan, she would have to take increased dosages of anti-depressants, which would be a professional indicator to her that she is not getting better. This clearly rejects the working peer’s suggestions to discuss this with her doctor by providing information to which she is only privy; this is also a way to demonstrate confidence that she (and her doctor) have been able to take care of her and her “bouts of depression”. So, while the working peer’s prior advice was most often rejected because it is not fitted to the caller’s trouble (e.g., go to the library as a solution to having no social activities), safe options fitted to a trouble can also be rejected by callers in similar ways. Regardless of how directive a working peer gets in putting forth ideas, callers still have ultimate responsibility for their actions and must be somehow empowered to do that effectively. But how? In the following, by letting the caller talk, the caller actually self-diagnoses and justifies why she would not likely act on her suicidal plan: 485 C: I’m on less medication as I get older

Authors: Pudlinski, Christopher.
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15
currently relevant or solvable trouble. This re-frames her earlier statement as only a report to
prove a point as to how depressed she gets. “That’s how depressed I get” characterizes her
earlier report as an example not a current trouble; this makes irrelevant the working peer’s
urgency to solve it. As such, the caller avoids responding to the suggested solution.
In turn, the caller in line 471 continues with her “illustration”: reporting on a current
action, taking medication, that demonstrates her progress over time, starting with when she
“first” took it (in 471-472) and contrasting to “now” (in 473), and providing a summary
assessment of this progress over time in 474 (“I have come down”), so as to imply that she is less
depressed now. Her logic: if I am taking less anti-depressant medication now, the doctor must
think I am less depressed. Perhaps if she told her doctor about her suicidal plan, she would have
to take increased dosages of anti-depressants, which would be a professional indicator to her that
she is not getting better. This clearly rejects the working peer’s suggestions to discuss this with
her doctor by providing information to which she is only privy; this is also a way to demonstrate
confidence that she (and her doctor) have been able to take care of her and her “bouts of
depression”.
So, while the working peer’s prior advice was most often rejected because it is not fitted
to the caller’s trouble (e.g., go to the library as a solution to having no social activities), safe
options fitted to a trouble can also be rejected by callers in similar ways. Regardless of how
directive a working peer gets in putting forth ideas, callers still have ultimate responsibility for
their actions and must be somehow empowered to do that effectively. But how? In the
following, by letting the caller talk, the caller actually self-diagnoses and justifies why she would
not likely act on her suicidal plan:
485
C: I’m on less medication as I get older


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