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Hot call to a warm line: Preliminary explorations into doing suicide prevention
Unformatted Document Text:  9 short pause, DH incorporates a solution within a query (see X, 1998, pp. 326-328). “Activity” is presented as the anecdote for “depression.” However, the option “activity” is broad enough that the working peer seeks ideas from the caller, instead of suggesting a particular activity. This strategy builds from a focus on caller/client responsibility (typical of a nondirective philosophy) and tries to get the caller to help construct her own solution as well. When no answer is forthcoming (e.g., a short pause in line 202), the working peer seeks permission to have asked the prior, perhaps prying, query. Letting the caller talk also means not inquiring too much and respecting a caller’s privacy. Callers should disclose information on their own. Nonetheless, in line 204, the caller reports an activity: walking the dog. Initially, the working peer positively assesses this report (“oh good”) while letting the caller provide more details of this reported activity. Typical of the caller, the subsequent report is a contrastive one. Not having any “social activity” disqualifies walking the dog as being an item in the category, corrected by the caller to be “social activity.” Walking the dog is an activity but not a social one. “None whatsoever” is a tag-on that embellishes this report so as to indicate she cannot think of anything she does that qualifies as a social activity; there is no further information for her to provide about this proffered solution. While the working peer acknowledges the report denying an ability to solve the problem, he tries to retain speakership (“uhm”) and perhaps pursue this issue further. However, the caller closes the topic by expressing a desire for “social activity” (“I would like to”) and then reporting on other activities, not necessarily viewed as social ones by the caller. She reports on these other activities: going to church and being involved in a church committee. Eventually, the working peer has an opportunity to return to this topic again and try a different tactic, in the search for a suitable “social activity”: EXAMPLE 3:

Authors: Pudlinski, Christopher.
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short pause, DH incorporates a solution within a query (see X, 1998, pp. 326-328). “Activity” is
presented as the anecdote for “depression.” However, the option “activity” is broad enough that
the working peer seeks ideas from the caller, instead of suggesting a particular activity. This
strategy builds from a focus on caller/client responsibility (typical of a nondirective philosophy)
and tries to get the caller to help construct her own solution as well. When no answer is
forthcoming (e.g., a short pause in line 202), the working peer seeks permission to have asked the
prior, perhaps prying, query. Letting the caller talk also means not inquiring too much and
respecting a caller’s privacy. Callers should disclose information on their own.
Nonetheless, in line 204, the caller reports an activity: walking the dog. Initially, the
working peer positively assesses this report (“oh good”) while letting the caller provide more
details of this reported activity. Typical of the caller, the subsequent report is a contrastive one.
Not having any “social activity” disqualifies walking the dog as being an item in the category,
corrected by the caller to be “social activity.” Walking the dog is an activity but not a social one.
“None whatsoever” is a tag-on that embellishes this report so as to indicate she cannot think of
anything she does that qualifies as a social activity; there is no further information for her to
provide about this proffered solution. While the working peer acknowledges the report denying
an ability to solve the problem, he tries to retain speakership (“uhm”) and perhaps pursue this
issue further. However, the caller closes the topic by expressing a desire for “social activity” (“I
would like to”) and then reporting on other activities, not necessarily viewed as social ones by
the caller. She reports on these other activities: going to church and being involved in a church
committee. Eventually, the working peer has an opportunity to return to this topic again and try a
different tactic, in the search for a suitable “social activity”:
EXAMPLE 3:


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