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Broadcast Ownership Regulation in a Border Era: An Analysis of how the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is Shaping the Debate on Broadcast Ownership Limits
Unformatted Document Text:  17 The citations, in footnotes, endnotes, or lists of references in each of the twelve reports were reviewed and the items meeting the criteria listed above identified. The next step was to identify the type of source being cited. Often this was clear from the title. For example an item from the Quarterly Journal of Economics was viewed as an economic source while something published in the Federal Communications Law Journal would be classed as a legal source. In cases where the title of the publication did not immediately reveal what type of material it included the Library of Congress classification for that publication was accessed and the class and subclass of that publication were used to categorize it. For example, the journal Review of Industrial Organization has the Library of Congress Classification HD 28.R482. This places it in class H, “Social Sciences”, subclass HD28-70, “Management. Industrial Management.” In the case of journal articles the title of the specific item was also used as an indication of the type of material it contained. One of the studies; number 7, “The Measurement of Local Television News and Public Affairs Programming” included explanatory footnotes, but cited no literature. A second study; number 8, “Consumer Survey on Media Usage” had been conducted for the FCC by the Nielsen Media Research. It had no footnotes or endnotes and cited no literature. Study number 1; “A Comparison of Media Outlets and Owners for Ten Selected Markets (1960, 1980, 2000)” did use a limited number of footnotes but the materials cited were all of the types excluded from this analysis. Therefore, we are left with nine studies that did cite literature covered by this analysis. Study number 2; “Viewpoint Diversity in Cross-Owned Newspapers and Television Stations: A Study of News Coverage of the 2000 Presidential Campaign” was one of the two studies noted earlier as having used content analysis as its methodology. Only one piece of literature cited met the criteria for inclusion in this study. This was an earlier paper published by

Authors: Blevins, Jeffrey. and Brown, Duncan.
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17
The citations, in footnotes, endnotes, or lists of references in each of the twelve reports
were reviewed and the items meeting the criteria listed above identified. The next step was to
identify the type of source being cited. Often this was clear from the title. For example an item
from the Quarterly Journal of Economics was viewed as an economic source while something
published in the Federal Communications Law Journal would be classed as a legal source. In
cases where the title of the publication did not immediately reveal what type of material it
included the Library of Congress classification for that publication was accessed and the class
and subclass of that publication were used to categorize it. For example, the journal Review of
Industrial Organization has the Library of Congress Classification HD 28.R482. This places it
in class H, “Social Sciences”, subclass HD28-70, “Management. Industrial Management.” In the
case of journal articles the title of the specific item was also used as an indication of the type of
material it contained.
One of the studies; number 7, “The Measurement of Local Television News and Public
Affairs Programming” included explanatory footnotes, but cited no literature. A second study;
number 8, “Consumer Survey on Media Usage” had been conducted for the FCC by the Nielsen
Media Research. It had no footnotes or endnotes and cited no literature. Study number 1; “A
Comparison of Media Outlets and Owners for Ten Selected Markets (1960, 1980, 2000)” did use
a limited number of footnotes but the materials cited were all of the types excluded from this
analysis. Therefore, we are left with nine studies that did cite literature covered by this analysis.
Study number 2; “Viewpoint Diversity in Cross-Owned Newspapers and Television
Stations: A Study of News Coverage of the 2000 Presidential Campaign” was one of the two
studies noted earlier as having used content analysis as its methodology. Only one piece of
literature cited met the criteria for inclusion in this study. This was an earlier paper published by


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