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Broadcast Ownership Regulation in a Border Era: An Analysis of how the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is Shaping the Debate on Broadcast Ownership Limits
Unformatted Document Text:  5 the negative implications of increased ownership concentration as being reduced budgets for local and national news programming, as well as fewer overseas news bureaus and less investigative reporting. Accordingly, Chester argues that the 12 studies commissioned by the FCC do not consider some of the negative consequences of increased ownership concentration for the public and urges the FCC “to engage the country in a national debate about media ownership” that includes input from academicians, journalists and political scientists, as well as civic and non-profit groups. FCC Commissioner Copps has also called for a broader discussion about media ownership rules than the FCC had planned. Copps specifically asked the FCC to consider holding hearings around the country, to speak with Americans and better gauge what the reality of particular media markets is. I don’t want to vote on final rules – and I would be reluctant to vote on final rules – unless and until I feel comfortable that we have the information and the analysis to inform our votes. We need as many stakeholders as we can find to take part in this proceeding. I want to hear more from industry, from labor, from consumers, from academe, from artists and entertainers, from anybody who has a stake in how this is resolved. (Concurring Statement of Commissioner Michael J. Copps, 2002, pp. 1-2) On October 23, 2002 the Center for Digital Democracy along with an eclectic array of media related groups, including the Newspaper Guild, Writers Guild of America, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, Seattle Times Corporation, Consumer Federation of America, Association of Independent Film and Videomakers, Department of Professional Employees, and the AFL-CIO filed a motion at the FCC to extend the time period for public comment regarding the Commission’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking from 90 days to four months in order to adequately respond to the 12 studies (see Center for Digital Democracy, 2002b). Chester asked

Authors: Blevins, Jeffrey. and Brown, Duncan.
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the negative implications of increased ownership concentration as being reduced budgets for
local and national news programming, as well as fewer overseas news bureaus and less
investigative reporting. Accordingly, Chester argues that the 12 studies commissioned by the
FCC do not consider some of the negative consequences of increased ownership concentration
for the public and urges the FCC “to engage the country in a national debate about media
ownership” that includes input from academicians, journalists and political scientists, as well as
civic and non-profit groups.
FCC Commissioner Copps has also called for a broader discussion about media
ownership rules than the FCC had planned. Copps specifically asked the FCC to consider
holding hearings
around the country, to speak with Americans and better gauge
what the reality of particular media markets is. I don’t want to
vote on final rules – and I would be reluctant to vote on final rules
– unless and until I feel comfortable that we have the information
and the analysis to inform our votes. We need as many
stakeholders as we can find to take part in this proceeding. I want
to hear more from industry, from labor, from consumers, from
academe, from artists and entertainers, from anybody who has a
stake in how this is resolved. (Concurring Statement of
Commissioner Michael J. Copps
, 2002, pp. 1-2)
On October 23, 2002 the Center for Digital Democracy along with an eclectic array of media
related groups, including the Newspaper Guild, Writers Guild of America, American Federation
of Television and Radio Artists, Seattle Times Corporation, Consumer Federation of America,
Association of Independent Film and Videomakers, Department of Professional Employees, and
the AFL-CIO filed a motion at the FCC to extend the time period for public comment regarding
the Commission’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking from 90 days to four months in order to
adequately respond to the 12 studies (see Center for Digital Democracy, 2002b). Chester asked


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