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CEO Images in Magazines and Newspapers, 1990-2001: The Growth of CEO Coverage and the Importance of Competence, Personal, and Integrity Dimensions to Image Formation
Unformatted Document Text:  CEO Images in Magazines--4 Pincus et al., 1991). With external stakeholders, CEOs often present and represent their organizations and may literally be the organization to such publics (Pincus et al., 1991). Gary (1986) contended that the CEO was the “voice” and image of the organization to those outside. Others suggest the CEO’s personality and style affect organizational personality (Garbett, 1988; Zorn, 2001) and the CEO’s image plays a leading role in establishing the company’s image (Gaines-Ross, 2000; Mazur, 1999; Stewart, 1998). However, Hutton et al. (2001) found that directional relationships between CEO image and organizational image or reputation were unclear, though the most admired or reputable companies were often led by well- known CEOs. Some researchers conclude that a CEO’s image or reputation, along with company reputation, influence product and service marketing, investor decisions, stock prices, and the recommendations of financial analysts (Fombrun, 1996; Gaines-Ross, 2000; Mazur, 1999). Image management has long been a primary function of public relations (Gandy, 1982; Hutton, 1999), but more recently practitioners have focused on reputation management and “personal” public relations (Hutton et al., 2001). In the latter approach, public relations activities are directed to “the constitution, positioning, and promotion of individuals to form a public identity” (Motion, 1999, p. 466). The idea is to brand and market the CEO or other individuals in order to differentiate the individual/company in a highly competitive and congested market. Companies have invested millions in reputation management programs to brand and promote CEOs (Dilenschneider, 1990), and professional associations have competed to provide relevant training over the past decade (Hutton et al., 2001; L. Grunig, 1993). However, a number of critics have cautioned that reputation management approaches are dangerous and potentially damaging if constructed images are not supported by executive actions and values (Budd, 1990; J. Grunig, 1993; Hutton, 1999).

Authors: Berger, Bruce. and Park, Dong-Jin.
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CEO Images in Magazines--4
Pincus et al., 1991). With external stakeholders, CEOs often present and represent their
organizations and may literally be the organization to such publics (Pincus et al., 1991).
Gary (1986) contended that the CEO was the “voice” and image of the organization to
those outside. Others suggest the CEO’s personality and style affect organizational personality
(Garbett, 1988; Zorn, 2001) and the CEO’s image plays a leading role in establishing the
company’s image (Gaines-Ross, 2000; Mazur, 1999; Stewart, 1998). However, Hutton et al.
(2001) found that directional relationships between CEO image and organizational image or
reputation were unclear, though the most admired or reputable companies were often led by well-
known CEOs. Some researchers conclude that a CEO’s image or reputation, along with company
reputation, influence product and service marketing, investor decisions, stock prices, and the
recommendations of financial analysts (Fombrun, 1996; Gaines-Ross, 2000; Mazur, 1999).
Image management has long been a primary function of public relations (Gandy, 1982;
Hutton, 1999), but more recently practitioners have focused on reputation management and
“personal” public relations (Hutton et al., 2001). In the latter approach, public relations activities
are directed to “the constitution, positioning, and promotion of individuals to form a public
identity” (Motion, 1999, p. 466). The idea is to brand and market the CEO or other individuals in
order to differentiate the individual/company in a highly competitive and congested market.
Companies have invested millions in reputation management programs to brand and
promote CEOs (Dilenschneider, 1990), and professional associations have competed to provide
relevant training over the past decade (Hutton et al., 2001; L. Grunig, 1993). However, a number
of critics have cautioned that reputation management approaches are dangerous and potentially
damaging if constructed images are not supported by executive actions and values (Budd, 1990;
J. Grunig, 1993; Hutton, 1999).


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