All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A chatroom ethnography: Evolution of community, norms, nonverbal communication
Unformatted Document Text:  A Chatroom Ethnography 13 used to frame comments as humorous in person are nonverbal; however, she is unclear how such framing might be accomplished in CMC. Yet, in her evidence of humor online she suggests that, despite the CMC people seek to and are successful in expressing themselves as individuals and gaining recognition for their individuality. In Jacobson’s (1999) analysis, he suggests that nonverbal cues are generally absent or minimal. Yet, he indicates that in FTF interactions nonverbal cues linguistic markers (e.g., accent) and facial expressions are critical to successful communication. This analysis begs the question, given the importance of nonverbal cues, could CMC be as successful in building community, establishing norms (and their regulation), and be a vehicle for most users to form personal relationships if nonverbal cues were minimal or absent? Most certainly not. Thus, one of two conclusions is appropriate. First, the conclusions from the other research are fundamentally flawed, or the use of nonverbal cues is much more prevalent than many authors recognize. I argue that the latter is the appropriate conclusion. Lindlif and Shatzer (1998) argue that people compensate for apparent inadequacies of CMC by producing cues that mark their identity, write in manners that reflect identity, and leak signs of themselves in how they communicate with others. In a direct study of nonverbal communication in mediated contexts, Witmer and Katzman (1997) identified what they termed graphic accents, such as - or /. This was a limited view of the role of nonverbal communication, but was an acknowledgement of the incorporation of nonverbal cues in CMC. Riva and Galimberti (1998) found that people incorporate visual or auditory (if spoken aloud) expressions of emotion in CMC and concluded that they were not only needed but used regularly. Further, Parks and Floyd (1996) found that mediated-communicators often use ‘smileys’ in imitating facial expression or paralinguistic features of conversation.

Authors: Diers, Audra.
first   previous   Page 13 of 32   next   last



background image
A Chatroom Ethnography
13
used to frame comments as humorous in person are nonverbal; however, she is unclear how such
framing might be accomplished in CMC. Yet, in her evidence of humor online she suggests that,
despite the CMC people seek to and are successful in expressing themselves as individuals and
gaining recognition for their individuality. In Jacobson’s (1999) analysis, he suggests that
nonverbal cues are generally absent or minimal. Yet, he indicates that in FTF interactions
nonverbal cues linguistic markers (e.g., accent) and facial expressions are critical to successful
communication.
This analysis begs the question, given the importance of nonverbal cues, could CMC be
as successful in building community, establishing norms (and their regulation), and be a vehicle
for most users to form personal relationships if nonverbal cues were minimal or absent? Most
certainly not. Thus, one of two conclusions is appropriate. First, the conclusions from the other
research are fundamentally flawed, or the use of nonverbal cues is much more prevalent than
many authors recognize. I argue that the latter is the appropriate conclusion. Lindlif and Shatzer
(1998) argue that people compensate for apparent inadequacies of CMC by producing cues that
mark their identity, write in manners that reflect identity, and leak signs of themselves in how
they communicate with others. In a direct study of nonverbal communication in mediated
contexts, Witmer and Katzman (1997) identified what they termed graphic accents, such as - or
/. This was a limited view of the role of nonverbal communication, but was an
acknowledgement of the incorporation of nonverbal cues in CMC. Riva and Galimberti (1998)
found that people incorporate visual or auditory (if spoken aloud) expressions of emotion in
CMC and concluded that they were not only needed but used regularly. Further, Parks and Floyd
(1996) found that mediated-communicators often use ‘smileys’ in imitating facial expression or
paralinguistic features of conversation.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.