All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A chatroom ethnography: Evolution of community, norms, nonverbal communication
Unformatted Document Text:  A Chatroom Ethnography 21 Conclusions about prior relationships. In all, this suggests that the nature of introductions in chat rooms can be an important indicator of how familiar people are with each other. This suggests that when there are few introductions made, people are not “seeking” connections as they did in the first couple of observations, but already have established those connections and are, instead, looking to interact with people to whom they feel connected. This also makes a different kind of dynamic for who is “welcomed” to participate in the particular chat rooms at particular times. The range of interaction types (e.g., looking just to talk, looking to have people IM, wanting to interact with particular types of people) is widened in rooms with few prior relationships and constricted in rooms with numerous interpersonal relationships. Ultimately, the different topics and conversational flow suggest that the extent to which the participants in the City chatroom discussions are just getting to know each other or are enmeshed in complex relationships with participants is a significant indicator of the types of conversations that we would expect to see in the chat rooms. A number of other issues also emerge out of this discussion. Not the least of which is a logical conclusion, supported by the conversations themselves, that online chat rooms are becoming an important means for some people to connect with others in their areas (Parks & Floyd, 1996; Postmes, et al., 1998). This is regardless of whether people are looking for initial contacts, or as a means for people to communicate with others they have met online, or even as a means for people who know each other from school or work to interact. Further, as people move through the evolution of these relationships, as Parks and Floyd (1996) described them (e.g., increasing interdepence to convergence of social networks), different types of communication take place. It is likely that any of those four flavors of chat room discussion described in the observations could be

Authors: Diers, Audra.
first   previous   Page 21 of 32   next   last



background image
A Chatroom Ethnography
21
Conclusions about prior relationships. In all, this suggests that the nature of introductions
in chat rooms can be an important indicator of how familiar people are with each other. This
suggests that when there are few introductions made, people are not “seeking” connections as
they did in the first couple of observations, but already have established those connections and
are, instead, looking to interact with people to whom they feel connected. This also makes a
different kind of dynamic for who is “welcomed” to participate in the particular chat rooms at
particular times. The range of interaction types (e.g., looking just to talk, looking to have people
IM, wanting to interact with particular types of people) is widened in rooms with few prior
relationships and constricted in rooms with numerous interpersonal relationships.
Ultimately, the different topics and conversational flow suggest that the extent to which
the participants in the City chatroom discussions are just getting to know each other or are
enmeshed in complex relationships with participants is a significant indicator of the types of
conversations that we would expect to see in the chat rooms. A number of other issues also
emerge out of this discussion. Not the least of which is a logical conclusion, supported by the
conversations themselves, that online chat rooms are becoming an important means for some
people to connect with others in their areas (Parks & Floyd, 1996; Postmes, et al., 1998). This is
regardless of whether people are looking for initial contacts, or as a means for people to
communicate with others they have met online, or even as a means for people who know each
other from school or work to interact. Further, as people move through the evolution of these
relationships, as Parks and Floyd (1996) described them (e.g., increasing interdepence to
convergence of social networks), different types of communication take place. It is likely that
any of those four flavors of chat room discussion described in the observations could be


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 21 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.