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East Asian Modernities and Localized Media and Cultural Studies
Unformatted Document Text:  _ differently from the reporters who carried out struggles for the freedom of the press, a lot of reporters who succeeded to become Ministers, chief staffs of the President, and National Assemblymen by cooperating with the political powers appeared. In the latter half of the 1980s both South Korea and Taiwan went through political democratization processes thereby enabling, at last, journalism to speak up with autonomy, independently of the political powers. Media studies, too, experienced a lot of characteristic changes following such political and social changes. Until the latter half of the 1980s, due to the ideological restrictions and oppression against journalistic freedom, in Taiwan and South Korea, media studies could not accomplish any special research achievements in the field of journalism regarding journalism itself. From the beginning of the 1970s researchers who came back to their own countries after receiving Ph.D. degrees in the United States introduced the liberalist journalistic system of the United States or gave weight to nonpolitical media effect studies. From the beginning of the 1970s until the latter half of the 1980s, the special characteristic of the media studies of South Korea and Taiwan was their introduction to apolitical media effect studies. (Xiu Qii Weng & Chong Gang Jing, 2000). Regarding the situation in which journalism had been won over by Cold War ideologies, the media researchers were either silent or looked the other way. Bai Nian Chen (2001) analyzed the subjects of 295 research proposals submitted to Taiwan’s National Science Council from 1966 until 2000. He showed that four subjects had formed the main stream of Taiwan’s media studies for thirty-five years. They were journalism and news media – 14%; mass media effects and communication processes – journalism that, and journalists who, resist and practice independent journalism.

Authors: Kang, Myung-Koo.
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differently from the reporters who carried out struggles for the freedom of the press, a
lot of reporters who succeeded to become Ministers, chief staffs of the President, and
National Assemblymen by cooperating with the political powers appeared.
In the latter half of the 1980s both South Korea and Taiwan went through political
democratization processes thereby enabling, at last, journalism to speak up with
autonomy, independently of the political powers. Media studies, too, experienced a lot
of characteristic changes following such political and social changes. Until the latter
half of the 1980s, due to the ideological restrictions and oppression against journalistic
freedom, in Taiwan and South Korea, media studies could not accomplish any special
research achievements in the field of journalism regarding journalism itself. From the
beginning of the 1970s researchers who came back to their own countries after receiving
Ph.D. degrees in the United States introduced the liberalist journalistic system of the
United States or gave weight to nonpolitical media effect studies.
From the beginning of the 1970s until the latter half of the 1980s, the special
characteristic of the media studies of South Korea and Taiwan was their introduction to
apolitical media effect studies. (Xiu Qii Weng & Chong Gang Jing, 2000). Regarding
the situation in which journalism had been won over by Cold War ideologies, the media
researchers were either silent or looked the other way.
Bai Nian Chen (2001) analyzed the subjects of 295 research proposals submitted to
Taiwan’s National Science Council from 1966 until 2000. He showed that four subjects
had formed the main stream of Taiwan’s media studies for thirty-five years. They were
journalism and news media – 14%; mass media effects and communication processes –
journalism that, and journalists who, resist and practice independent journalism.


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