All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

HOW INTERPERSONAL TRUST MANIFESTS ONLINE BEHAVIOR: A case study exploring the impact of societal levels of interpersonal trust on the utilization of online source credible information.
Unformatted Document Text:  How interpersonal trust manifests 21 German auction participants exhibit their modest levels of interpersonal trust when they choose a product online, such that they are more willing to participate in auctions from sellers with lower ratings. However, a higher seller rating does significantly increase the number of bidders who are willing to participate in the German auctions, as compared to the same in France. The first part of the study is consistent with past research on source credibility and consumer behavior (see e.g. Moon and Tikoo, 1997; Jain and Posavac, 2001). That is, online consumers under uncertainty tend to look for source credible information when making decisions under uncertainty. The second part of the study presents evidence of an interesting dynamic of culture on this behavior. Information on the internet, with its high potential for anonymity and reduced social cues, tends to be evaluated more severely in a society low in interpersonal trust, as compared to a society which enjoys higher levels of trust. This behavior impacts the use of source credible information such that cultures that enjoy higher levels of interpersonal trust are more trusting of online information and often does not verify the credibility of the source. In contrast cultures with low levels of trust, tend to rely or verify source credibility and favor high credible sources in their decision. These results are substantiated by research on media credibility. Schweiger (2000) compares perceptions of media credibility within Germany, and reports a lower credibility for the web in comparison to television and newspapers. Flanagin and Metzger (2000) compared the perceptions of internet credibility within the United States and found an almost equitable credibility perception for the internet as compared to newspapers, and

Authors: Vishwanath, Arun.
first   previous   Page 21 of 33   next   last



background image
How interpersonal trust manifests 21
German auction participants exhibit their modest levels of interpersonal trust
when they choose a product online, such that they are more willing to participate
in auctions from sellers with lower ratings. However, a higher seller rating does
significantly increase the number of bidders who are willing to participate in the
German auctions, as compared to the same in France.
The first part of the study is consistent with past research on source
credibility and consumer behavior (see e.g. Moon and Tikoo, 1997; Jain and
Posavac, 2001). That is, online consumers under uncertainty tend to look for
source credible information when making decisions under uncertainty. The
second part of the study presents evidence of an interesting dynamic of culture on
this behavior. Information on the internet, with its high potential for anonymity
and reduced social cues, tends to be evaluated more severely in a society low in
interpersonal trust, as compared to a society which enjoys higher levels of trust.
This behavior impacts the use of source credible information such that cultures
that enjoy higher levels of interpersonal trust are more trusting of online
information and often does not verify the credibility of the source. In contrast
cultures with low levels of trust, tend to rely or verify source credibility and favor
high credible sources in their decision. These results are substantiated by research
on media credibility. Schweiger (2000) compares perceptions of media credibility
within Germany, and reports a lower credibility for the web in comparison to
television and newspapers. Flanagin and Metzger (2000) compared the
perceptions of internet credibility within the United States and found an almost
equitable credibility perception for the internet as compared to newspapers, and


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 21 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.