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HOW INTERPERSONAL TRUST MANIFESTS ONLINE BEHAVIOR: A case study exploring the impact of societal levels of interpersonal trust on the utilization of online source credible information.
Unformatted Document Text:  How interpersonal trust manifests 6 1998), adoption and use of new media. Research in this ‘culturally mediated computing’ (Ess and Sudweeks, 1998) perspective argues that since culture is essentially a property of the collective in which an individual exists (Durkheim, 1938), the structural and normative properties of the collective creates certain pressures on citizens and conditions how they use and respond to media (Shah et al, 2001). That is, the socio-cultural elements of communities coalesce or constrain the individuals micro-level media consumption behaviors. Research discriminating national cultural characteristics are plentiful (e.g. Hofstede 1980; Herbig, 1994; Hall, 1975 etc.); however limited research explicates cultural influences on micro level media use. Much of the culturally mediated research has focused on the influences of culture on the technology adoption process. Using Hofstede’s (1980) work on culture, and Draft and Lengel’s (1984) information richness theory, Straub (1994) accounts for the differential perception of Email and Fax in Japan and the United States. Danowski (2001) links societal values measured by Inglehart (1997) to a nations Internet development. His study links national Internet development to societal values data for 39 nations from the early 1990’s on post materialism, personal freedom, subjective well being, interpersonal trust, friendship, tolerance for diversity and individual sexuality. Maitland (1998) proposes a link between culture and network technology diffusion based on theories of Hofstede (1980), Herbig (1994), and Hall (1975). Vishwanath (2002) empirically examines Internet diffusion based on Hofstede’s (1980) cultural schemas and presents evidence linking a nations score on uncertainty avoidance, individualism and power distance to its rate of Internet

Authors: Vishwanath, Arun.
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How interpersonal trust manifests 6
1998), adoption and use of new media. Research in this ‘culturally mediated
computing’ (Ess and Sudweeks, 1998) perspective argues that since culture is
essentially a property of the collective in which an individual exists (Durkheim,
1938), the structural and normative properties of the collective creates certain
pressures on citizens and conditions how they use and respond to media (Shah et
al, 2001). That is, the socio-cultural elements of communities coalesce or
constrain the individuals micro-level media consumption behaviors. Research
discriminating national cultural characteristics are plentiful (e.g. Hofstede 1980;
Herbig, 1994; Hall, 1975 etc.); however limited research explicates cultural
influences on micro level media use. Much of the culturally mediated research
has focused on the influences of culture on the technology adoption process.
Using Hofstede’s (1980) work on culture, and Draft and Lengel’s (1984)
information richness theory, Straub (1994) accounts for the differential perception
of Email and Fax in Japan and the United States. Danowski (2001) links societal
values measured by Inglehart (1997) to a nations Internet development. His study
links national Internet development to societal values data for 39 nations from the
early 1990’s on post materialism, personal freedom, subjective well being,
interpersonal trust, friendship, tolerance for diversity and individual sexuality.
Maitland (1998) proposes a link between culture and network technology
diffusion based on theories of Hofstede (1980), Herbig (1994), and Hall (1975).
Vishwanath (2002) empirically examines Internet diffusion based on Hofstede’s
(1980) cultural schemas and presents evidence linking a nations score on
uncertainty avoidance, individualism and power distance to its rate of Internet


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