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HOW INTERPERSONAL TRUST MANIFESTS ONLINE BEHAVIOR: A case study exploring the impact of societal levels of interpersonal trust on the utilization of online source credible information.
Unformatted Document Text:  How interpersonal trust manifests 7 diffusion. In probably the only study cross culturally comparing online interaction, Vishwanath (2002) compares the differential impact of information on eBay auction participants across three countries, America, Germany and Japan; and presents evidence of significant differences in the amount and type of information available on the eBay sites to the cultural dynamics of uncertainty avoidance (Hofstede, 1980) and communication context (Hall, 1975). This study falls within the latter part of the new media/culture continuum, and probes the effect of societal levels of interpersonal trust as measured by Inglehart (197) on Internet use. World Values Survey and Interpersonal Trust Although not studying the Internet or online behavior, a team of scientists headed by Inglehart (1997) beginning two decades ago, conducted the World Values Survey in three waves during the early 1980s, early 1990s, and between 1995-97. Using the same translated survey instruments, and adding more nations in each subsequent period, the World Values Survey surveyed more than 60 societies and covered more than 70% of the world’s population by 1997. Using data from the World Values Survey, Inglehart (1997) suggests an evolutionary shift of industrialized societies from materialistic values to post materialistic values. In particular, he defines postmaterialism as being comprised of five elements namely 1) seeing that people have more to say about how things are done at their jobs and in their communities, 2) giving people more to say in important government decisions, 3) protecting freedom of speech, 4) progress towards a less impersonal society, and 5) progress toward a society in which ideas

Authors: Vishwanath, Arun.
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How interpersonal trust manifests 7
diffusion. In probably the only study cross culturally comparing online
interaction, Vishwanath (2002) compares the differential impact of information on
eBay auction participants across three countries, America, Germany and Japan;
and presents evidence of significant differences in the amount and type of
information available on the eBay sites to the cultural dynamics of uncertainty
avoidance (Hofstede, 1980) and communication context (Hall, 1975). This study
falls within the latter part of the new media/culture continuum, and probes the
effect of societal levels of interpersonal trust as measured by Inglehart (197) on
Internet use.
World Values Survey and Interpersonal Trust
Although not studying the Internet or online behavior, a team of scientists
headed by Inglehart (1997) beginning two decades ago, conducted the World
Values Survey in three waves during the early 1980s, early 1990s, and between
1995-97. Using the same translated survey instruments, and adding more nations
in each subsequent period, the World Values Survey surveyed more than 60
societies and covered more than 70% of the world’s population by 1997. Using
data from the World Values Survey, Inglehart (1997) suggests an evolutionary
shift of industrialized societies from materialistic values to post materialistic
values. In particular, he defines postmaterialism as being comprised of five
elements namely 1) seeing that people have more to say about how things are
done at their jobs and in their communities, 2) giving people more to say in
important government decisions, 3) protecting freedom of speech, 4) progress
towards a less impersonal society, and 5) progress toward a society in which ideas


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