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Audience Perception of Framed Music during Times of War
Unformatted Document Text:  Music During Times of War 12 <INSERT FIGURE 1 ABOUT HERE> Analysis of Figure 1 indicates that reminiscence songs averaged about 12 percent of the popular selection in the weeks before Pearl Harbor. However, after the attack, the number of popular reminiscence songs did increase, hitting a peak of 50 percent of the popular song list on April 1, 1942 (17 weeks after Pearl Harbor), and averaging at almost 17 percent of the popular songs. This information indicates that the music audience taste did reflect a heightened interest in reminiscence music in the period following Pearl Harbor. The audience more frequently listened to sings with the titles “Miss You,” “Lamp of Memory,” and “She’ll Always Remember.” Further analysis of Figure 1 indicates that the number of love songs did not significantly shift after Pearl Harbor. Prior to the attack, the number of love songs averaged 22 percent of the popular songs per week. In the weeks following the attack, the number of love songs remained at an average of approximately 20 percent of the popular songs. This lack of shift reflects the preferences of an audience equally prone to listen to love songs in the six months following the attack. Listeners maintained their preference of songs with the titles “How Do I Know It’s Real?,” “Happy in Love,” and “Keep Lovelight Burning.” Figure 1 also indicates that the number of patriotism songs increased after Pearl Harbor. Directly following the attack, there was a strong surge of patriotism songs, and then the number leveled off. Following the attack, listeners were more likely to listen to songs called “Peaceful in the Country,” “Chattanooga Choo Choo,” and “White Cliffs of Dover.” The number of patriotism songs more often approached 10 percent of the popular song selection after the attack. Figure 1 reveals that the number of security/comfort songs was not tremendously affected after Pearl Harbor, the average number of popular security/comfort songs remained below 10 percent both before and after the attack. But, an important note in Figure 1 is the sharp peak in the number of security/comfort songs for the single week following the attack which reflects an immediate increase in audience desire for security/comfort songs. Song titles include “Last Night I Said a Prayer,” “I’ll Pray for

Authors: Graham, Erica.
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Music During Times of War 12
<INSERT FIGURE 1 ABOUT HERE>
Analysis of Figure 1 indicates that reminiscence songs averaged about 12 percent of the popular
selection in the weeks before Pearl Harbor. However, after the attack, the number of popular
reminiscence songs did increase, hitting a peak of 50 percent of the popular song list on April 1, 1942 (17
weeks after Pearl Harbor), and averaging at almost 17 percent of the popular songs. This information
indicates that the music audience taste did reflect a heightened interest in reminiscence music in the
period following Pearl Harbor. The audience more frequently listened to sings with the titles “Miss You,”
“Lamp of Memory,” and “She’ll Always Remember.”
Further analysis of Figure 1 indicates that the number of love songs did not significantly shift
after Pearl Harbor. Prior to the attack, the number of love songs averaged 22 percent of the popular songs
per week. In the weeks following the attack, the number of love songs remained at an average of
approximately 20 percent of the popular songs. This lack of shift reflects the preferences of an audience
equally prone to listen to love songs in the six months following the attack. Listeners maintained their
preference of songs with the titles “How Do I Know It’s Real?,” “Happy in Love,” and “Keep Lovelight
Burning.”
Figure 1 also indicates that the number of patriotism songs increased after Pearl Harbor. Directly
following the attack, there was a strong surge of patriotism songs, and then the number leveled off.
Following the attack, listeners were more likely to listen to songs called “Peaceful in the Country,”
“Chattanooga Choo Choo,” and “White Cliffs of Dover.” The number of patriotism songs more often
approached 10 percent of the popular song selection after the attack.
Figure 1 reveals that the number of security/comfort songs was not tremendously affected after
Pearl Harbor, the average number of popular security/comfort songs remained below 10 percent both
before and after the attack. But, an important note in Figure 1 is the sharp peak in the number of
security/comfort songs for the single week following the attack which reflects an immediate increase in
audience desire for security/comfort songs. Song titles include “Last Night I Said a Prayer,” “I’ll Pray for


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