All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Audience Perception of Framed Music during Times of War
Unformatted Document Text:  Music During Times of War 14 Analysis of Figure 2 indicates that the number of security/comfort songs increased following September 11 th . Although the number of popular security/comfort songs averaged at 14 percent per week prior to the attack, the average number of popular security/comfort songs increased to an average of 20 percent in the weeks following the attack. Among these song titles were “Survivor,” “Ride With Me,” and “Follow Me.” These song titles conveyed a sense of protection, security, and comfort which the audience favored in the six months following the World Trade Center attack. World War II Song Content Analysis While song titles reveal themes within a song, only the song lyrics could thoroughly frame the theme. In deconstructing the lyrics, I classified songs by theme categories, word choice, symbols, and lyric repetition. <INSERT FIGURE 3 ABOUT HERE> Analysis of Figure 3 shows that the number of love songs permeated the year surrounding Pearl Harbor. By deconstructing the song lyrics, the love song was the most predominant theme. The songs classified within the love theme had distinguishable lyrics: “the one you love,” “thinkin’ of falling in love,” and “I was born to be yours.” One song in particular, “I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire,” originally was classified as a security/comfort song in the song title analysis. However, through investigation of the lyrics, the song conveyed the importance of love through a “flame in your heart.” As observable in Figure 3, the second most common theme involved patriotism. These lyrics included “Deep in the Heart of Texas” and “to board a Chattanooga Choo Choo.” References to Texas revealed a pride in America, and song references to the “Chattanooga” train indicated an excitement for the journey despite a departure from home. Reminiscence songs were the third most popular songs among Americans. The reminiscence songs primarily contained lyrics in the past tense: “we had fun,” “dreaming the time away,” and “one lovely yesterday.” Time and light, symbols of change, were repeatedly mentioned in these songs. Security/comfort songs were the least popular framed messages among the popular music audience. Among these lyrics inciting security and comfort: “Daddy, you ought to get the best for me.”

Authors: Graham, Erica.
first   previous   Page 14 of 22   next   last



background image
Music During Times of War 14
Analysis of Figure 2 indicates that the number of security/comfort songs increased following
September 11
th
. Although the number of popular security/comfort songs averaged at 14 percent per week
prior to the attack, the average number of popular security/comfort songs increased to an average of 20
percent in the weeks following the attack. Among these song titles were “Survivor,” “Ride With Me,”
and “Follow Me.” These song titles conveyed a sense of protection, security, and comfort which the
audience favored in the six months following the World Trade Center attack.
World War II Song Content Analysis
While song titles reveal themes within a song, only the song lyrics could thoroughly frame the
theme. In deconstructing the lyrics, I classified songs by theme categories, word choice, symbols, and
lyric repetition.
<INSERT FIGURE 3 ABOUT HERE>
Analysis of Figure 3 shows that the number of love songs permeated the year surrounding Pearl
Harbor. By deconstructing the song lyrics, the love song was the most predominant theme. The songs
classified within the love theme had distinguishable lyrics: “the one you love,” “thinkin’ of falling in
love,” and “I was born to be yours.” One song in particular, “I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire,”
originally was classified as a security/comfort song in the song title analysis. However, through
investigation of the lyrics, the song conveyed the importance of love through a “flame in your heart.”
As observable in Figure 3, the second most common theme involved patriotism. These lyrics
included “Deep in the Heart of Texas” and “to board a Chattanooga Choo Choo.” References to Texas
revealed a pride in America, and song references to the “Chattanooga” train indicated an excitement for
the journey despite a departure from home.
Reminiscence songs were the third most popular songs among Americans. The reminiscence
songs primarily contained lyrics in the past tense: “we had fun,” “dreaming the time away,” and “one
lovely yesterday.” Time and light, symbols of change, were repeatedly mentioned in these songs.
Security/comfort songs were the least popular framed messages among the popular music
audience. Among these lyrics inciting security and comfort: “Daddy, you ought to get the best for me.”


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.