All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visual Strategies in U.S. and Chinese TV Ads
Unformatted Document Text:  3 than words. As technology evolves, visuals communicators have increasing means of manipulative tactics to persuade consumers of visual messages to buy products, subscribe to certain ideologies, and to conform to certain pressures. Convinced of the evocative powers of visuals, scholars even claim that visual statements can argue just as verbal statements can. The image of a black little girl embracing a white little girl, for example, makes a forceful argument that innocent children have no racial prejudices and those come from adults (Blair, 1996; Birdsell & Groarke, 1996). 1 The present comparative paper, then, concentrates on the visual cultural indicators and strategies used in advertisements under different culture circumstances, i.e. low- context vs. high-context, individualistic vs. collectivistic cultures, in the hope of unraveling the relationship between manifested visual behavior and their visual environments. High-Context vs. Low-Context Cultures The degree of “contextuality” is a construct often used to describe global culture differences. There are high-context (HC) cultures and low-context (LC) cultures, between which there are significant differences in communication. A low context culture is one in which things are spelled out as concisely and thoroughly as possible. The messages are explicit, and there is considerable dependence on what is actually said or written. A high context culture is one in which the communicators assume a great amount of shared knowledge and views, so that less is offered explicitly and much more is implicit or communicated in indirect fashions. In a low context culture, more responsibility is placed 1 For a counter argument, see Fleming (1996).

Authors: Xue, Fei., Zhou, Shuhua. and Zhou, Peiqin.
first   previous   Page 3 of 29   next   last



background image
3
than words. As technology evolves, visuals communicators have increasing means of
manipulative tactics to persuade consumers of visual messages to buy products, subscribe
to certain ideologies, and to conform to certain pressures. Convinced of the evocative
powers of visuals, scholars even claim that visual statements can argue just as verbal
statements can. The image of a black little girl embracing a white little girl, for example,
makes a forceful argument that innocent children have no racial prejudices and those
come from adults (Blair, 1996; Birdsell & Groarke, 1996).
1
The present comparative paper, then, concentrates on the visual cultural indicators
and strategies used in advertisements under different culture circumstances, i.e. low-
context vs. high-context, individualistic vs. collectivistic cultures, in the hope of
unraveling the relationship between manifested visual behavior and their visual
environments.
High-Context vs. Low-Context Cultures
The degree of “contextuality” is a construct often used to describe global culture
differences. There are high-context (HC) cultures and low-context (LC) cultures, between
which there are significant differences in communication. A low context culture is one in
which things are spelled out as concisely and thoroughly as possible. The messages are
explicit, and there is considerable dependence on what is actually said or written. A high
context culture is one in which the communicators assume a great amount of shared
knowledge and views, so that less is offered explicitly and much more is implicit or
communicated in indirect fashions. In a low context culture, more responsibility is placed
1
For a counter argument, see Fleming (1996).


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.