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Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  17 decelerate, or maintain the balance between the level of economic development and democracy. Moreover, groups like business and workers have historically contributed to the establishment and expansion of democratic rule. The emerging bourgeois class in Great Britain, for instance, was able to successfully negotiate power-sharing arrangements with the traditional elite. Workers in the West have also fought for the expansion of the franchise, which was initially limited to the wealthy (See also Huber, E. et al., 1993; Rustow, D., 1970). However, the emergence of the bourgeois and working classes has been a function of economic development itself, and thus, it seems that the political process, at least partly, depends on economic development. Moreover, the success of political leaders in bringing about and sustaining democratic rule will likely depend on how well the economy is growing. Another factor that seems to have some effect on bringing about democracy is external influence, including colonial legacy, war defeat, and the end of the Cold War. It is clear that former British colonies like India, Botswana, Mauritius, and Trinidad and Tobago have remained democratic since independence. Thus, one may assume that British colonial legacy influences democracy (See Emerson, R., 1960 for instance). On the other hand, most of former British colonies like Uganda, Nigeria, and Ghana have not had a long record of democracy. A key difference between the two group of countries seems to be the leaders’ predisposition to democracy. Indeed, leaders such as Nehru of India and Seretse Khama of Botswana were democrats, whereas leaders like Obete of Uganda and Balewa of Nigeria were autocrats. Thus, one may assume that it is not British colonial legacy per se that sustains democracy, but the interaction of this legacy with democratically predisposed leaders (Tiruneh, G., 2001). Democratic constitutions of 1994; Bollen, K. and R. Jackman, 1990; Bollen, K., 1983; Tiruneh, G., 2001 for instance).

Authors: Tracy, James.
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17
decelerate, or maintain the balance between the level of economic development and
democracy. Moreover, groups like business and workers have historically contributed to
the establishment and expansion of democratic rule. The emerging bourgeois class in
Great Britain, for instance, was able to successfully negotiate power-sharing
arrangements with the traditional elite. Workers in the West have also fought for the
expansion of the franchise, which was initially limited to the wealthy (See also Huber, E.
et al., 1993; Rustow, D., 1970). However, the emergence of the bourgeois and working
classes has been a function of economic development itself, and thus, it seems that the
political process, at least partly, depends on economic development. Moreover, the
success of political leaders in bringing about and sustaining democratic rule will likely
depend on how well the economy is growing.
Another factor that seems to have some effect on bringing about democracy is external
influence, including colonial legacy, war defeat, and the end of the Cold War. It is clear
that former British colonies like India, Botswana, Mauritius, and Trinidad and Tobago
have remained democratic since independence. Thus, one may assume that British
colonial legacy influences democracy (See Emerson, R., 1960 for instance). On the other
hand, most of former British colonies like Uganda, Nigeria, and Ghana have not had a
long record of democracy. A key difference between the two group of countries seems
to be the leaders’ predisposition to democracy. Indeed, leaders such as Nehru of India
and Seretse Khama of Botswana were democrats, whereas leaders like Obete of Uganda
and Balewa of Nigeria were autocrats. Thus, one may assume that it is not British
colonial legacy per se that sustains democracy, but the interaction of this legacy with
democratically predisposed leaders (Tiruneh, G., 2001). Democratic constitutions of
1994; Bollen, K. and R. Jackman, 1990; Bollen, K., 1983; Tiruneh, G., 2001 for instance).


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