All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  25 on education, particularly for the children of the poor. Education along with wealth seems to promote social mobility and equality. The economic benefits that some of these groups, like students, gain from the political bargain will also likely increase the level of political influence they would have in their future political life. In short, the role of the political process or market is that it could promote the distribution of income and power. Thus, the distribution of income, and power, is partly (although not mainly) a function of governmental distributive policies. 11 Given that interest groups and individuals in democracies are interested in governmental policies like tax and spend, regulate and deregulate, reward and penalize, and own and privatize, one way of crudely approximating the political process or market may be to specify it as the level of government consumption. Government consumption may be further subdivided as revenue that comes from taxation and as income that is gained from other sources, particularly from operating state-owned enterprises (See also World Development Indicators, 2001). It should be noted, however, that the two types of revenues may not necessarily have the same kind or level of impact on the distribution of income and power among citizens of a given society. Yet, the political process or market itself, although may have ‘a life of its own’, seems to depend on the economic process. The political process could consistently promote redistribution of economic and political benefits among groups if, for the most part, there is a healthy and a growing economy. 11 Indeed, the difference in the level of income equality between social democratic countries like Sweden and liberal democratic ones like the United States may be partly explained by differences in governmental distributive policies (See also Hewitt, C., 1977; Hibbs, D., 1977; Hicks, A. and D. Swank, 1992 for instance).

Authors: Tracy, James.
first   previous   Page 25 of 54   next   last



background image
25
on education, particularly for the children of the poor. Education along with wealth
seems to promote social mobility and equality. The economic benefits that some of
these groups, like students, gain from the political bargain will also likely increase the
level of political influence they would have in their future political life. In short, the role
of the political process or market is that it could promote the distribution of income and
power. Thus, the distribution of income, and power, is partly (although not mainly) a
function of governmental distributive policies.
11
Given that interest groups and individuals in democracies are interested in
governmental policies like tax and spend, regulate and deregulate, reward and penalize,
and own and privatize, one way of crudely approximating the political process or market
may be to specify it as the level of government consumption. Government consumption
may be further subdivided as revenue that comes from taxation and as income that is
gained from other sources, particularly from operating state-owned enterprises (See also
World Development Indicators, 2001). It should be noted, however, that the two types
of revenues may not necessarily have the same kind or level of impact on the distribution
of income and power among citizens of a given society. Yet, the political process or
market itself, although may have ‘a life of its own’, seems to depend on the economic
process. The political process could consistently promote redistribution of economic and
political benefits among groups if, for the most part, there is a healthy and a growing
economy.
11
Indeed, the difference in the level of income equality between social democratic countries like Sweden
and liberal democratic ones like the United States may be partly explained by differences in governmental
distributive policies (See also Hewitt, C., 1977; Hibbs, D., 1977; Hicks, A. and D. Swank, 1992 for
instance).


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 25 of 54   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.