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Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  28 one as Marx argued. While Fukuyama (1992: xi) may be correct in arguing that the final destination of ideological evolution is the establishment of liberal democracy, this destination is much more evolved than the current state of democratic systems is. The mere presence of political and civil rights and procedures, although very important, seems to be insufficient. But what is the level of democratic system that is likely achievable? Before I answer the foregoing question, I will discuss what an equal distribution of power is. It is when each citizen is politically equal; it is when an individual citizen has an equal chance of influencing public policy or wining election for the best possible office, say for becoming a prime minister or a president of a given country. An equal distribution of power would exist only in a perfect or ideal democratic system. This equality can be statistically expressed as: P (1) = 1 / X; where P (1) is the probability of one individual of become a leader and X is the total number of eligible citizens in a given country. In other words, ideal democracy would exist if individual leaders were chosen at random. Such a system is somewhat analogous to the classical Greek city-state democracy except that it would be established in a modern nation state. Such a system even would look like Marx’s communist society since no individual would have more income or property than others would. However, although such a system may be desired on moral or philosophical grounds, its actual occurrence is perhaps unlikely. One major reason that will likely impede the likelihood of perfect or ideal democracy is that modern democracies are established on liberal principles. In modern liberal democracies, individual citizens possess rights and freedom of choice. Individuals in modern liberal democracies are mainly motivated by self-interest, analogous to Adam Smith argument in

Authors: Tracy, James.
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one as Marx argued. While Fukuyama (1992: xi) may be correct in arguing that the final
destination of ideological evolution is the establishment of liberal democracy, this
destination is much more evolved than the current state of democratic systems is. The
mere presence of political and civil rights and procedures, although very important,
seems to be insufficient. But what is the level of democratic system that is likely
achievable?
Before I answer the foregoing question, I will discuss what an equal distribution of
power is. It is when each citizen is politically equal; it is when an individual citizen has
an equal chance of influencing public policy or wining election for the best possible
office, say for becoming a prime minister or a president of a given country. An equal
distribution of power would exist only in a perfect or ideal democratic system. This
equality can be statistically expressed as: P (1) = 1 / X; where P (1) is the probability of
one individual of become a leader and X is the total number of eligible citizens in a given
country. In other words, ideal democracy would exist if individual leaders were chosen
at random. Such a system is somewhat analogous to the classical Greek city-state
democracy except that it would be established in a modern nation state. Such a system
even would look like Marx’s communist society since no individual would have more
income or property than others would. However, although such a system may be desired
on moral or philosophical grounds, its actual occurrence is perhaps unlikely. One major
reason that will likely impede the likelihood of perfect or ideal democracy is that modern
democracies are established on liberal principles. In modern liberal democracies,
individual citizens possess rights and freedom of choice. Individuals in modern liberal
democracies are mainly motivated by self-interest, analogous to Adam Smith argument in


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