All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  32 produce income that is, for the most part, based on human ingenuity and merit. Related to the second is my third assumption that the distribution of skills and knowledge among individuals are unequal. Merit-based economic systems will likely produce unequal distribution of income. While these assumptions may help us to provide some support for an upward trend in the level of income, they do not necessarily prove that such a trend in the distribution of income of a given society take a form of normal distribution. This is where logic or reason (besides the empirical evidence) comes into the picture. My prediction of a normal distribution of income, thus normal democracy, is based on the assumption that unequal skills and knowledge among citizens of today’s democracies (that happen to be skewed or biased) would gradually become unbiased and necessarily take a form of normal distribution over time. 16 As every citizen gets an equal opportunity and access to education, as artificial barriers to social mobility and success diminish or cease to exist over time, and most importantly as markets become increasingly competitive, the current skewed distributions of skills and knowledge (and thus income and power) will likely give way to a normal distribution. 17 The Law of Average is a mathematical or statistical fact that it is likely to prevail in nature when of lower, middle, and upper classes, respectively. In the income curve, we may have 10%, 65%, 25% representing the incomes of lower, middle, and upper classes, respectively. 16 In contrast, John Rawls (1999) argues that we should ignore differences in natural inequalities of talents among citizens when we consider any form of distribution of rewards. 17 It is interesting to note that although the income that goes to the three middle quintiles (the middle class) seems to have grown in industrial democracies over time, current income reports about the United States, for instance, observe that some upper class elites have in fact gotten richer (see Browning, L., 2003 for instance). This situation seems to be caused partly by the advent of the digital revolution in the latter part of the twentieth century. However, as more firms compete in the information business in the future, the level of income that goes to the high-tech entrepreneurs is likely to go down. Moreover, as firms become increasingly competitive, the level of profits they make (and the monetary bonus that goes to higher management) will likely go down over time.

Authors: Tracy, James.
first   previous   Page 32 of 54   next   last



background image
32
produce income that is, for the most part, based on human ingenuity and merit. Related
to the second is my third assumption that the distribution of skills and knowledge among
individuals are unequal. Merit-based economic systems will likely produce unequal
distribution of income. While these assumptions may help us to provide some support
for an upward trend in the level of income, they do not necessarily prove that such a trend
in the distribution of income of a given society take a form of normal distribution. This
is where logic or reason (besides the empirical evidence) comes into the picture. My
prediction of a normal distribution of income, thus normal democracy, is based on the
assumption that unequal skills and knowledge among citizens of today’s democracies
(that happen to be skewed or biased) would gradually become unbiased and necessarily
take a form of normal distribution over time.
16
As every citizen gets an equal
opportunity and access to education, as artificial barriers to social mobility and success
diminish or cease to exist over time, and most importantly as markets become
increasingly competitive, the current skewed distributions of skills and knowledge (and
thus income and power) will likely give way to a normal distribution.
17
The Law of
Average is a mathematical or statistical fact that it is likely to prevail in nature when
of lower, middle, and upper classes, respectively. In the income curve, we may have 10%, 65%, 25%
representing the incomes of lower, middle, and upper classes, respectively.
16
In contrast, John Rawls (1999) argues that we should ignore differences in natural inequalities of talents
among citizens when we consider any form of distribution of rewards.
17
It is interesting to note that although the income that goes to the three middle quintiles (the middle class)
seems to have grown in industrial democracies over time, current income reports about the United States,
for instance, observe that some upper class elites have in fact gotten richer (see Browning, L., 2003 for
instance). This situation seems to be caused partly by the advent of the digital revolution in the latter part
of the twentieth century. However, as more firms compete in the information business in the future, the
level of income that goes to the high-tech entrepreneurs is likely to go down. Moreover, as firms become
increasingly competitive, the level of profits they make (and the monetary bonus that goes to higher
management) will likely go down over time.


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 32 of 54   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.