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Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  35 Hence, some form of inequality is part of human nature (See Lenski, G., 1984; Russell, B. 1938 for instance). The characteristics of normal democracy lead me to assume that some form of economic and political inequalities have always been part of human nature. Even when the primitive communities equally shared what they produced, it did not necessarily mean that every one’s contribution to the production of these resources was equal; it just meant that they had an arrangement of equal sharing. However, because the people lived in small communities, where some elders, chiefs, or wise men might have the upper hand in making decisions, and because the means of productions were very primitive to produce in excess of need, I assume that the political and economic inequalities present among the people were very small (See also Bollen, K. and P Paxton, 1997). This leads me to assume that early human communities had a more equal or normal distribution of political (and economic) power. If so, there might have been a natural political equilibrium in the beginning. I call it natural because it was perhaps a natural outcome, not an outcome of agreed upon or a coordinated actions or efforts by the people. Equilibrium could occur either by coordination of actions or without (see Ordeshook, P., 1980 for instance). If such an equilibrium had been maintained throughout human history, the distribution of income, knowledge, and power would have remained normally distributed. However, sometime in the past, this equilibrium might have started to give way to human passion and reason, including to benefits that may have resulted from differences in intellect and productiveness. Self-interest incentives like becoming richer and more powerful may have led the breakup of the more or less egalitarian norms. Eventually, differences in income, knowledge, and power would lead to more greed

Authors: Tracy, James.
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35
Hence, some form of inequality is part of human nature (See Lenski, G., 1984; Russell,
B. 1938 for instance).
The characteristics of normal democracy lead me to assume that some form of
economic and political inequalities have always been part of human nature. Even when
the primitive communities equally shared what they produced, it did not necessarily mean
that every one’s contribution to the production of these resources was equal; it just meant
that they had an arrangement of equal sharing. However, because the people lived in
small communities, where some elders, chiefs, or wise men might have the upper hand in
making decisions, and because the means of productions were very primitive to produce
in excess of need, I assume that the political and economic inequalities present among the
people were very small (See also Bollen, K. and P Paxton, 1997). This leads me to
assume that early human communities had a more equal or normal distribution of
political (and economic) power. If so, there might have been a natural political
equilibrium in the beginning. I call it natural because it was perhaps a natural outcome,
not an outcome of agreed upon or a coordinated actions or efforts by the people.
Equilibrium could occur either by coordination of actions or without (see Ordeshook, P.,
1980 for instance). If such an equilibrium had been maintained throughout human
history, the distribution of income, knowledge, and power would have remained normally
distributed. However, sometime in the past, this equilibrium might have started to give
way to human passion and reason, including to benefits that may have resulted from
differences in intellect and productiveness. Self-interest incentives like becoming richer
and more powerful may have led the breakup of the more or less egalitarian norms.
Eventually, differences in income, knowledge, and power would lead to more greed


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