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Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  42 Implications of Normal Democracy to Economic and Social Systems Our understanding of the concept of democracy will be enhanced if we do not study the dynamics of the political system in isolation from the economic and social systems. Indeed, it is the assumption of this paper, and modernization theory, that the three systems affect one another and change together over time. Many scholars, for instance, assume that the capitalist economic system is the foundation of democratic rule (Schumpeter, 1976; de Schweinitz, K., 1964; Macpherson, 1965). The capitalist economic system also seems to promote the presence of a higher level of income distribution or a more egalitarian society (See also Friedman, M., 1962; Bollen, K. and R. Jackman, 1995). With respect to the development or variation of the social system, the least egalitarian system could be the era of slavery, where slave owners consumed all or most of the production. The social system in the feudal era seemed to be more egalitarian than in the slave system, since serfs kept a small portion of the production. Finally, in today’s capitalist democracies, more people have achieved the status (or are considered part) of the middle class (See also Scully, G., 1992). And even a more egalitarian system could occur at normal democracy where the income distribution of citizens would become normally distributed. Moreover, the social values and preferences of society, consistent with the enlargement of the middle class, are likely to become increasingly moderate over time. After normal democracy is achieved, the values or preferences of the mean citizen would be decisive. Moreover, I posit that the economic system does change from pure monopoly to pure competition, with oligopoly and monopolistic competition falling in the middle. One

Authors: Tracy, James.
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42
Implications of Normal Democracy to Economic and Social Systems
Our understanding of the concept of democracy will be enhanced if we do not study
the dynamics of the political system in isolation from the economic and social systems.
Indeed, it is the assumption of this paper, and modernization theory, that the three
systems affect one another and change together over time. Many scholars, for instance,
assume that the capitalist economic system is the foundation of democratic rule
(Schumpeter, 1976; de Schweinitz, K., 1964; Macpherson, 1965). The capitalist
economic system also seems to promote the presence of a higher level of income
distribution or a more egalitarian society (See also Friedman, M., 1962; Bollen, K. and R.
Jackman, 1995).
With respect to the development or variation of the social system, the least egalitarian
system could be the era of slavery, where slave owners consumed all or most of the
production. The social system in the feudal era seemed to be more egalitarian than in the
slave system, since serfs kept a small portion of the production. Finally, in today’s
capitalist democracies, more people have achieved the status (or are considered part) of
the middle class (See also Scully, G., 1992). And even a more egalitarian system could
occur at normal democracy where the income distribution of citizens would become
normally distributed. Moreover, the social values and preferences of society, consistent
with the enlargement of the middle class, are likely to become increasingly moderate over
time. After normal democracy is achieved, the values or preferences of the mean citizen
would be decisive.
Moreover, I posit that the economic system does change from pure monopoly to pure
competition, with oligopoly and monopolistic competition falling in the middle. One


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