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Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  43 would appreciate the presence of a general relativity and variation between the political and economic (and social) systems if one considers the parallels between autocracy and monopoly and between perfect democracy and perfect or pure competition. In autocracy, power is concentrated in the hands of one, usually a king or an emperor. In monopoly, there exists one single seller of a product. In a perfect democracy, the distribution of power is equal, whereas in pure competition, the level of profit and the product that each firm in a given industry makes is equal and identical, respectively. In economics, the pure competition model is considered as an ideal that may not be realized. Many political scientists, including this author, assume that perfect democracy may not be achievable. Moreover, oligopoly and monopolistic competition in economics are similar to oligarchic democracy and today’s democracies, respectively (See also Schumpeter, J., 1976). Oligopoly in economics refers to the presence of some competition in the market but with a few sellers. The few big oil companies in the United States may be an example of this type of market. Oligarchic democracy, on the other hand, refers to the presence of some form of political competition but voting rights and public offices are open only to a few rich elites. A good example to this would be the limited democratic rule in the United States from 1789 to until a white-male suffrage was provided in the 1830s. Monopolistic competition refers to the market that is predominantly seen in today’s established democracies; there is a lot of competition and the number of sellers and buyers is high, although not as high as in a pure competition. In this market, the level of profits is higher, on average, than that is possible under the pure competition. Sellers also tend to produce products that are differentiated in, for instance, quality or service. Analogous to the monopolistic competition in the market are

Authors: Tracy, James.
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43
would appreciate the presence of a general relativity and variation between the political
and economic (and social) systems if one considers the parallels between autocracy and
monopoly and between perfect democracy and perfect or pure competition. In
autocracy, power is concentrated in the hands of one, usually a king or an emperor. In
monopoly, there exists one single seller of a product. In a perfect democracy, the
distribution of power is equal, whereas in pure competition, the level of profit and the
product that each firm in a given industry makes is equal and identical, respectively. In
economics, the pure competition model is considered as an ideal that may not be realized.
Many political scientists, including this author, assume that perfect democracy may not
be achievable. Moreover, oligopoly and monopolistic competition in economics are
similar to oligarchic democracy and today’s democracies, respectively (See also
Schumpeter, J., 1976). Oligopoly in economics refers to the presence of some
competition in the market but with a few sellers. The few big oil companies in the United
States may be an example of this type of market. Oligarchic democracy, on the other
hand, refers to the presence of some form of political competition but voting rights and
public offices are open only to a few rich elites. A good example to this would be the
limited democratic rule in the United States from 1789 to until a white-male suffrage was
provided in the 1830s. Monopolistic competition refers to the market that is
predominantly seen in today’s established democracies; there is a lot of competition and
the number of sellers and buyers is high, although not as high as in a pure competition.
In this market, the level of profits is higher, on average, than that is possible under the
pure competition. Sellers also tend to produce products that are differentiated in, for
instance, quality or service. Analogous to the monopolistic competition in the market are


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