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Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  6 transition. Fourth, I will discuss the goals of democratic development. Fifth, I will go back to a more primitive historic period and inquire about the possibility of the presence of political equilibrium in the past. Sixth, I will discuss the nature of sociopolitical conditions that would follow normal democracy. Seventh, I will put forth the implications of normal democracy to social and economic systems. Finally, I will provide conclusions to the study. A New Theory of Democracy Before I define democracy, I will make a distinction between the ideal or perfect democracy and the current democratic system. The ideal or perfect democracy may be defined as a political system that allows the presence of an equal distribution of power (See also Bollen, K. and P. Paxton, 1997). Such a system need not be achievable and, because of the presence of some inherent tension between individual liberty and equality, I assume it is not. However, similar to the economists use of the ideal or pure competition model, we can refer to the ideal or perfect democracy as a model in which real world political systems may be compared to and judged by. Now, what shall we call today’s democracies then? Dahl (1971) tried without success to introduce the word “polyarchy”, or majority rule, to distinguish current democracies from the ideal. While acknowledging the shortcomings of today’s democracies, as Dahl does, I will, however, continue to follow the common practice of using the word ‘democracy’. The very word of democracy simply inspires and invokes the emotion of people (See also Sartori, G., 1962 and Lenski, G., 1984). Thus, the word ‘democracy’ from now on refers to current democracies, whereas ‘ideal democracy’ or ‘perfect democracy’ refers to the ideal. I define democracy as a political procedure that allows the presence of political rights, civil

Authors: Tracy, James.
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transition. Fourth, I will discuss the goals of democratic development. Fifth, I will go
back to a more primitive historic period and inquire about the possibility of the presence
of political equilibrium in the past. Sixth, I will discuss the nature of sociopolitical
conditions that would follow normal democracy. Seventh, I will put forth the
implications of normal democracy to social and economic systems. Finally, I will
provide conclusions to the study.
A New Theory of Democracy
Before I define democracy, I will make a distinction between the ideal or perfect
democracy and the current democratic system. The ideal or perfect democracy may be
defined as a political system that allows the presence of an equal distribution of power
(See also Bollen, K. and P. Paxton, 1997). Such a system need not be achievable and,
because of the presence of some inherent tension between individual liberty and equality,
I assume it is not. However, similar to the economists use of the ideal or pure
competition model, we can refer to the ideal or perfect democracy as a model in which
real world political systems may be compared to and judged by. Now, what shall we call
today’s democracies then? Dahl (1971) tried without success to introduce the word
“polyarchy”, or majority rule, to distinguish current democracies from the ideal. While
acknowledging the shortcomings of today’s democracies, as Dahl does, I will, however,
continue to follow the common practice of using the word ‘democracy’. The very word
of democracy simply inspires and invokes the emotion of people (See also Sartori, G.,
1962 and Lenski, G., 1984). Thus, the word ‘democracy’ from now on refers to current
democracies, whereas ‘ideal democracy’ or ‘perfect democracy’ refers to the ideal. I
define democracy as a political procedure that allows the presence of political rights, civil


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