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Rebel Mystic: Toward a Theorization of the Aesthetic and Communicative Dimensions of Reggae and Dub
Unformatted Document Text:  8 Over time, the distribution of power among citizens will grow, and keeps growing, for reasons that would be clear later on, indefinitely with out necessarily achieving the perfect or ideal democracy. From the foregoing discussion two questions emerge: first, what causes democracy in the first place? Second, related to the first question is, why does the level of democracy or the distribution of political power vary over time? I will address these questions in the next five sections. Transition to a Democratic Rule For an object to displace a position (an effect), some force (a cause) must be applied to it. In the same way, for democracy to exist or to increase in level or degree or quality, some forces or conditions need to allow it to do so. Social science is not an exact science like physics, but it seems very useful to gauge a cause and effect relationship between concepts, even if it is just an approximation. I hypothesize that the most important factors that lead to democratic transitions are economic development, the political process, and external factors. Of these three variables, I also assume that economic development is the most important one in promoting democratic transition. My assumption of the connection between economic development and democratic transition is derived from modernization theory. There are several versions of modernization theory, including economic modernization and political modernization (See for instance Rostow, W. 1990 and Huntington, S., 1968, respectively). In this paper, I assume that modernization theory explains the connection between socioeconomic and political systems. Major political works of philosophers like Aristotle, Harrington, and Karl Marx are grounded in the assumptions of modernization theory. For instance, Aristotle was one of the first philosophers who attempted to explain the causes of

Authors: Tracy, James.
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8
Over time, the distribution of power among citizens will grow, and keeps growing, for
reasons that would be clear later on, indefinitely with out necessarily achieving the
perfect or ideal democracy. From the foregoing discussion two questions emerge: first,
what causes democracy in the first place? Second, related to the first question is, why
does the level of democracy or the distribution of political power vary over time? I will
address these questions in the next five sections.
Transition to a Democratic Rule
For an object to displace a position (an effect), some force (a cause) must be applied to
it. In the same way, for democracy to exist or to increase in level or degree or quality,
some forces or conditions need to allow it to do so. Social science is not an exact
science like physics, but it seems very useful to gauge a cause and effect relationship
between concepts, even if it is just an approximation. I hypothesize that the most
important factors that lead to democratic transitions are economic development, the
political process, and external factors. Of these three variables, I also assume that
economic development is the most important one in promoting democratic transition.
My assumption of the connection between economic development and democratic
transition is derived from modernization theory. There are several versions of
modernization theory, including economic modernization and political modernization
(See for instance Rostow, W. 1990 and Huntington, S., 1968, respectively). In this paper,
I assume that modernization theory explains the connection between socioeconomic and
political systems. Major political works of philosophers like Aristotle, Harrington, and
Karl Marx are grounded in the assumptions of modernization theory. For instance,
Aristotle was one of the first philosophers who attempted to explain the causes of


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