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Visual Education and The Internet Camp: A Study of Underprivileged Children and Their Web Pages
Unformatted Document Text:  5 times, “but that kind of knowing does not suffice for behavior; it is not the kind of knowing based on the oneness of the organism and the environment” (Kelley, 1947, p. 52). This hands-on approach to media literacy generally, and visual literacy specifically, continues to be embraced in more contemporary discussions (for example see Zettl, 1998, Hobbs, 1999; Lewis and Jhally, 1998). It is from this experiential standpoint that the web pages created by the children are examined for their visual elements and what those elements say about the children. The children’s web pages are understood as a product of an educational process based on concepts of visual literacy. Following a review of past visual education programs, a description of the Internet Camp ensues. Then the children who were involved in this program are described in terms of their social characteristics. Knowing who the children are and their general social condition might help better understand the content and design of their web pages. The research concludes with a detailed examination of several of the children’s web pages. The Internet Camp and Visual Education Programs in General The Internet Camp constituted an educational program in visual literacy. It offered a practical method for teaching children how to create web pages. Indirectly, it taught them how to use the Internet to express themselves visually. Visual educational programs have been around since the 1960s (Debes, 1978). 3 Programs were developing at this time due to the accumulating evidence that television and film 1981; and Cantlay, 1996) 3 Earl C. Kelley’s (1947) book, Education for What is Real, might be cited as the earliest exposition on visual literacy and education. In it he explores the implications of seeing and interpreting as based on motives, purposes, and experiences of the viewer. Other ground breaking efforts include Colin Turbayne’s (1962), The Myth of Metaphor, and the National

Authors: Mullen, Lawrence.
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times, “but that kind of knowing does not suffice for behavior; it is not the kind of knowing
based on the oneness of the organism and the environment” (Kelley, 1947, p. 52). This hands-on
approach to media literacy generally, and visual literacy specifically, continues to be embraced
in more contemporary discussions (for example see Zettl, 1998, Hobbs, 1999; Lewis and Jhally,
1998).
It is from this experiential standpoint that the web pages created by the children are
examined for their visual elements and what those elements say about the children. The
children’s web pages are understood as a product of an educational process based on concepts of
visual literacy. Following a review of past visual education programs, a description of the
Internet Camp ensues. Then the children who were involved in this program are described in
terms of their social characteristics. Knowing who the children are and their general social
condition might help better understand the content and design of their web pages. The research
concludes with a detailed examination of several of the children’s web pages.
The Internet Camp and Visual Education Programs in General
The Internet Camp constituted an educational program in visual literacy. It offered a
practical method for teaching children how to create web pages. Indirectly, it taught them how to
use the Internet to express themselves visually.
Visual educational programs have been around since the 1960s (Debes, 1978).
3
Programs were developing at this time due to the accumulating evidence that television and film
1981; and Cantlay, 1996)
3
Earl C. Kelley’s (1947) book, Education for What is Real, might be cited as the earliest
exposition on visual literacy and education. In it he explores the implications of seeing and
interpreting as based on motives, purposes, and experiences of the viewer. Other ground
breaking efforts include Colin Turbayne’s (1962), The Myth of Metaphor, and the National


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