All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Visual Education and The Internet Camp: A Study of Underprivileged Children and Their Web Pages
Unformatted Document Text:  6 were affecting children in positive and negative ways. “It was the British who apparently were the first to believe that the systematic offering of film making opportunities to the young might be an important part of an educational experience” (Debes, 1978, p. 4). Coming from England, Tony Hodgkinson began a program in the Boston area that taught film making at the college and high school levels. However, it is believed that the first regularly taught course in film making was one by Sister Bede Sullivan in 1963 and 1964 (Debes, 1978, p.4). 4 Similar programs were quick to follow. With the idea that the motion picture was a kind of visual novel, most of these early programs were in English departments. Outside of the academic context, Jack Debes and a group of 4-H leaders skilled in photojournalism and visual communication developed a program called 4-H Photography in 1961. Full-fledged by 1964, it became the largest program of photographic instruction in the world (Debes, 1978, p. 5). First published in 1982, Instructional Media and the New Technologies of Instruction reported that “an exemplary visual literacy education program was developed at an elementary school in a Midwestern state” (Heinich, et al., 1989, p. 71): By using visual materials themselves, the children manipulate colors, shapes, symbols, and spatial relationships. They developed perceptual skills and expressive abilities. Practice in drawing inferences from pictorial sequences leads to better critical viewing skills: distinguishing fantasy, persuasion, and propaganda from fact (Heinich, et al., 1989, p. 71). Because of the generally positive results reported from most of these ground-breaking educational programs in visual literacy, the Internet Camp anticipated positive results as well. It Council of Teachers of English’s (1965) book, The Motion Picture and the Teaching of English. 4 A cursory search for information about Sister Sullivan (1915-1993) did not supply a lot of detail about her work in visual education. She taught in Kansas, Missouri, Colorado, and Nebraska before spending 21 years in Victoria, British Columbia. Print, film, television, and tape media were her forte. In 1967 she wrote a book entitled, Movies: Universal Language. The book

Authors: Mullen, Lawrence.
first   previous   Page 6 of 23   next   last



background image
6
were affecting children in positive and negative ways. “It was the British who apparently were
the first to believe that the systematic offering of film making opportunities to the young might
be an important part of an educational experience” (Debes, 1978, p. 4). Coming from England,
Tony Hodgkinson began a program in the Boston area that taught film making at the college and
high school levels. However, it is believed that the first regularly taught course in film making
was one by Sister Bede Sullivan in 1963 and 1964 (Debes, 1978, p.4).
4
Similar programs were
quick to follow. With the idea that the motion picture was a kind of visual novel, most of these
early programs were in English departments. Outside of the academic context, Jack Debes and a
group of 4-H leaders skilled in photojournalism and visual communication developed a program
called 4-H Photography in 1961. Full-fledged by 1964, it became the largest program of
photographic instruction in the world (Debes, 1978, p. 5).
First published in 1982, Instructional Media and the New Technologies of Instruction
reported that “an exemplary visual literacy education program was developed at an elementary
school in a Midwestern state” (Heinich, et al., 1989, p. 71):
By using visual materials themselves, the children manipulate colors, shapes,
symbols, and spatial relationships. They developed perceptual skills and
expressive abilities. Practice in drawing inferences from pictorial sequences leads
to better critical viewing skills: distinguishing fantasy, persuasion, and
propaganda from fact (Heinich, et al., 1989, p. 71).

Because of the generally positive results reported from most of these ground-breaking
educational programs in visual literacy, the Internet Camp anticipated positive results as well. It
Council of Teachers of English’s (1965) book, The Motion Picture and the Teaching of English.
4
A cursory search for information about Sister Sullivan (1915-1993) did not supply a lot
of detail about her work in visual education. She taught in Kansas, Missouri, Colorado, and
Nebraska before spending 21 years in Victoria, British Columbia. Print, film, television, and tape
media were her forte. In 1967 she wrote a book entitled, Movies: Universal Language. The book


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.