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Visual Education and The Internet Camp: A Study of Underprivileged Children and Their Web Pages
Unformatted Document Text:  7 was designed as a two week program. Long before the camp started, a coordinated effort with the local school district 5 identified a school with the greatest need and highest at-risk population of students. Once this school was identified, the project coordinator enlisted the school’s administration to invite 30 students to attend the camp. Since two weeks 6 was not a lot time to teach children how to make web pages, instruction was oriented around web page design at the expense of learning more about critical analysis of the Internet and the various ethical and moral aspects of using the Internet. Students were taught Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML). For a variety of reasons it was decided that this was better than having the children create web pages using a “wysiwyg” 7 web page software package such as Microsoft’s FrontPage. It was determined that this was the best way to learn “what goes on behind the scenes” of a web page, so to speak. HTML is what is generated by wysiwyg web design software. Essentially, the children were learning something that they could use without the need for expensive software packages. All they would need is a computer and access to the Internet to apply ideas learned at the Internet Camp at a later time to update their web page or create new web pages. In general, the camp promoted an experience that heightened the children’s conscious awareness about Internet web pages in terms of how they are designed rather than why. Without going into the intricacies of HTML, it can be described as a tool for web page was primarily designed for the study of film in high school. 5 The school district in question is currently the sixth largest in the United States. 6 The Internet Camp met Monday through Friday from 12 noon to 5 PM, for a total of ten days, or 50 hours of instruction. 7 Computer programer jargon for “what you see is what you get”

Authors: Mullen, Lawrence.
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background image
7
was designed as a two week program. Long before the camp started, a coordinated effort with
the local school district
5
identified a school with the greatest need and highest at-risk population
of students. Once this school was identified, the project coordinator enlisted the school’s
administration to invite 30 students to attend the camp.
Since two weeks
6
was not a lot time to teach children how to make web pages, instruction
was oriented around web page design at the expense of learning more about critical analysis of
the Internet and the various ethical and moral aspects of using the Internet. Students were taught
Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML). For a variety of reasons it was decided that this was
better than having the children create web pages using a “wysiwyg”
7
web page software package
such as Microsoft’s FrontPage. It was determined that this was the best way to learn “what goes
on behind the scenes” of a web page, so to speak. HTML is what is generated by wysiwyg web
design software. Essentially, the children were learning something that they could use without
the need for expensive software packages. All they would need is a computer and access to the
Internet to apply ideas learned at the Internet Camp at a later time to update their web page or
create new web pages. In general, the camp promoted an experience that heightened the
children’s conscious awareness about Internet web pages in terms of how they are designed
rather than why.
Without going into the intricacies of HTML, it can be described as a tool for web page
was primarily designed for the study of film in high school.
5
The school district in question is currently the sixth largest in the United States.
6
The Internet Camp met Monday through Friday from 12 noon to 5 PM, for a total of ten
days, or 50 hours of instruction.
7
Computer programer jargon for “what you see is what you get”


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