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Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Study of the Relationship between Media Use and Anomie in America's Fastest Growing Town
Unformatted Document Text:  11 sports, local chapters of national organizations, neighborhood groups, workplace groups, or any other type of group the respondent felt a part of counted as group membership. Sixty-one percent of the respondents said they belonged to some sort of group. Thirty-four percent said that they did not belong to any group. 5 Two more regression models were based on length of residence. One model examined people who had lived in the area for less than ten years. The second model examined those who had lived in the area for ten or more years. 6 The last two models were based on income. One model included those who made less than $40,000 in household income last year. The second model included those who made $40,000 or more in the previous year. The logic for creating these two regression models is the same as that used for the two length-of-residence models. Procedure. The questionnaire was mailed to 2000 residents living in and around Las Vegas in the Spring of 1999. The random sample of resident addresses was generated by a professional bulk mailing service. The response rate was so low that it was mailed out a second time to the same residents in the Summer of 1999. A total of 363 of them were returned for a 4 Public affairs television shows would include local government proceedings and public access-type programs. 5 The remaining percentage represents those who did not answer the question. 6 Length of residence was measured by asking respondents how many years they had lived in Las Vegas. It was logical to create two regression models by dividing the respondents as was done here because the median was 10 years. Another reason to divide the length of residence into only two groups was to have an adequate N to properly run a regression analysis. As Allison (1999) indicates, to do a decent job, you need at least five cases per variable when you do regression analysis.

Authors: Mullen, Lawrence.
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11
sports, local chapters of national organizations, neighborhood groups, workplace groups, or any
other type of group the respondent felt a part of counted as group membership. Sixty-one percent
of the respondents said they belonged to some sort of group. Thirty-four percent said that they
did not belong to any group.
5
Two more regression models were based on length of residence. One model examined
people who had lived in the area for less than ten years. The second model examined those who
had lived in the area for ten or more years.
6
The last two models were based on income. One model included those who made less
than $40,000 in household income last year. The second model included those who made
$40,000 or more in the previous year. The logic for creating these two regression models is the
same as that used for the two length-of-residence models.
Procedure. The questionnaire was mailed to 2000 residents living in and around Las
Vegas in the Spring of 1999. The random sample of resident addresses was generated by a
professional bulk mailing service. The response rate was so low that it was mailed out a second
time to the same residents in the Summer of 1999. A total of 363 of them were returned for a
4
Public affairs television shows would include local government proceedings and public
access-type programs.
5
The remaining percentage represents those who did not answer the question.
6
Length of residence was measured by asking respondents how many years they had
lived in Las Vegas. It was logical to create two regression models by dividing the respondents as
was done here because the median was 10 years. Another reason to divide the length of residence
into only two groups was to have an adequate N to properly run a regression analysis. As Allison
(1999) indicates, to do a decent job, you need at least five cases per variable when you do
regression analysis.


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