All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Study of the Relationship between Media Use and Anomie in America's Fastest Growing Town
Unformatted Document Text:  7 that every new form of communication technology is greeted with the hope “of desired social change, the key to the re-creation of a humane community, [and] the means for returning to a cherished social bliss” (p. 115). So the effect that Putnam hopes new telecommunication technologies will have for rebuilding community will, in the end, probably have some of the same problems as traditional print and broadcast media along with new problems of their own. As with the other media discussed above, this summary greatly simplifies the variety of issues surrounding the link between new media and anomie, but a broad impression of the relationship can be drawn (see Jones,1998 for an extended discussion). Other mediated activity. Other media-related activities such as listening to the radio, using the VCR, and going out into the community to attend movies or live music events find little or no research-related activity surrounding their influence on social bonds or anomie. This study includes them in the following analysis. Social Variables. Income is a socio-economic variable that has been linked to anomie and media use. Merton (1938) said that anomie results from a disparity between the goals and means prescribed by society. Those with less money may have a greater sense of anomie since they fail to achieve monetary success and the trappings of wealth. People with more money have been shown to have more active communication patterns and use media differently than lower income groups (see Jeffres, 1997, pp. 51-53 for a brief summary). In general, affluence provides for greater access to a variety of media and more time to spend with them (Whitney, 1975). Length of residence in a community is an indicator of how attached people feel to the place they live, but it also affects how they use the media. Long-time residents may use local media to understand complex political issues in the community. Newcomers to the community

Authors: Mullen, Lawrence.
first   previous   Page 7 of 25   next   last



background image
7
that every new form of communication technology is greeted with the hope “of desired social
change, the key to the re-creation of a humane community, [and] the means for returning to a
cherished social bliss” (p. 115). So the effect that Putnam hopes new telecommunication
technologies will have for rebuilding community will, in the end, probably have some of the
same problems as traditional print and broadcast media along with new problems of their own.
As with the other media discussed above, this summary greatly simplifies the variety of issues
surrounding the link between new media and anomie, but a broad impression of the relationship
can be drawn (see Jones,1998 for an extended discussion).
Other mediated activity. Other media-related activities such as listening to the radio,
using the VCR, and going out into the community to attend movies or live music events find
little or no research-related activity surrounding their influence on social bonds or anomie. This
study includes them in the following analysis.
Social Variables. Income is a socio-economic variable that has been linked to anomie and
media use. Merton (1938) said that anomie results from a disparity between the goals and means
prescribed by society. Those with less money may have a greater sense of anomie since they fail
to achieve monetary success and the trappings of wealth. People with more money have been
shown to have more active communication patterns and use media differently than lower income
groups (see Jeffres, 1997, pp. 51-53 for a brief summary). In general, affluence provides for
greater access to a variety of media and more time to spend with them (Whitney, 1975).
Length of residence in a community is an indicator of how attached people feel to the
place they live, but it also affects how they use the media. Long-time residents may use local
media to understand complex political issues in the community. Newcomers to the community


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 7 of 25   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.