All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

An Invisible Leverage in the Adoption of Online Social Support Community
Unformatted Document Text:  Running Head: Invisible Leverage in Adoption of Online Social Support Community 3 Other researchers tried to introduce the social network approach to the study of OSSC. The social network approach has been widely applied to study social support in general (Gottlieb, 1981). This approach intends to discover how structural form of networks constrains individual behavior (1981, Wellman). They focus on the analysis of network characteristics rather than individual characteristics. Although a majority of organizational CMC studies have analyzed network data (Rice, 1994), few OSSC studies have benefited from this approach. Muncer, Loader, Burrow et al. (2000) conducted a simple form of network analysis to show the structures of two OSSCs: one for people with depression and the other for people with diabetes. Participants in the diabetes OSSC exchanged more informational support while more emotional support-oriented postings were found in the depression OSSC. In addition to the difference in types of social support, they also found some network structural differences. That is, the diabetes network was more diffuse than the depression network. In spite of their efforts, their study had some limitations in terms of network analysis. They sampled postings, and therefore, not all participants were entered in their network analysis. Therefore, they could not take full advantages of the social network analysis approach. Comparative studies on online and off-line social support have made important scholarly contributions to understanding the nature of online social support. Turner, Grube, and Meyers (2001) advanced a theoretical understanding of OSSC with a different approach. Their survey of 42 cancer-related OSSC participants revealed a contextual condition for cancer patients’ participation in cancer-related OSSCs. Participation in OSSCs increased only when participants did not find meaningful relationships with or high social support from significant individuals in their face-to-face personal networks, and when the meaningful relationships and high social support were not available in their OSSCs. Their theoretical contribution to OSSC studies is that they related computer-mediated communication (CMC) to a general social support theory called “optimal matching theory,” which argues that certain types of social support may be most effective when matched with certain types of stressful incidents (Cutrona & Russell, 1990). However, their conclusion seems self-evident since it basically restated a general human tendency to turn to alternative means when people are not satisfied with current means. Eastin and LaRose (2001) found, based on Bandura’s social cognitive theory, that online interaction positively affect overall levels of social support. Their survey of 243 social support- oriented usenet newsgroup participants showed that the size of the overall network (including

Authors: Yun, Haejin., Park, Songyi. and Kim, Hee-Jung.
first   previous   Page 3 of 37   next   last



background image
Running Head: Invisible Leverage in Adoption of Online Social Support Community
3
Other researchers tried to introduce the social network approach to the study of OSSC.
The social network approach has been widely applied to study social support in general
(Gottlieb, 1981). This approach intends to discover how structural form of networks constrains
individual behavior (1981, Wellman). They focus on the analysis of network characteristics
rather than individual characteristics. Although a majority of organizational CMC studies have
analyzed network data (Rice, 1994), few OSSC studies have benefited from this approach.
Muncer, Loader, Burrow et al. (2000) conducted a simple form of network analysis to show the
structures of two OSSCs: one for people with depression and the other for people with diabetes.
Participants in the diabetes OSSC exchanged more informational support while more emotional
support-oriented postings were found in the depression OSSC. In addition to the difference in
types of social support, they also found some network structural differences. That is, the
diabetes network was more diffuse than the depression network. In spite of their efforts, their
study had some limitations in terms of network analysis. They sampled postings, and therefore,
not all participants were entered in their network analysis. Therefore, they could not take full
advantages of the social network analysis approach.
Comparative studies on online and off-line social support have made important scholarly
contributions to understanding the nature of online social support. Turner, Grube, and Meyers
(2001) advanced a theoretical understanding of OSSC with a different approach. Their survey of
42 cancer-related OSSC participants revealed a contextual condition for cancer patients’
participation in cancer-related OSSCs. Participation in OSSCs increased only when participants
did not find meaningful relationships with or high social support from significant individuals in
their face-to-face personal networks, and when the meaningful relationships and high social
support were not available in their OSSCs. Their theoretical contribution to OSSC studies is that
they related computer-mediated communication (CMC) to a general social support theory called
“optimal matching theory,” which argues that certain types of social support may be most
effective when matched with certain types of stressful incidents (Cutrona & Russell, 1990).
However, their conclusion seems self-evident since it basically restated a general human
tendency to turn to alternative means when people are not satisfied with current means.
Eastin and LaRose (2001) found, based on Bandura’s social cognitive theory, that online
interaction positively affect overall levels of social support. Their survey of 243 social support-
oriented usenet newsgroup participants showed that the size of the overall network (including


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 37   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.