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A Structural Equation Model of Support for English-only Policies and Social Limitation of Immigrants and Minorities
Unformatted Document Text:  Social Limitation Structural Equation Model 4 Results showed that opposition to bilingual education originated with both prejudice and the perception of threat. Moreover, the authors discovered an overlap between these two concepts that they found difficult to disentangle. Anglo opposition to bilingual education was associated with living in a heavily Latino area, perceiving educational conflict between Latinos and Anglo-Americans in terms of competition for resources, and negative feelings toward Latinos. Interestingly, Anglos who lived in Latino areas and could speak Spanish were as strongly opposed to bilingual education programs as those who lived in these areas and could not speak Spanish. The authors speculated that symbolic fears about the spread of Spanish might have fueled some of the opposition to bilingual education programs. Huddy and Sears (1995) argue that insecurity about social identity and English language dominance among Whites may be regarded as "new racism" which materializes as resentment about minority language use, competition for resources, and affirmative action. However, dominant groups may feel a sense of threat not based on objective fact but upon sheer supposition. Therefore, if Anglos believe that Spanish is likely to overwhelm English (even if objective evidence suggests that it is not likely), they may take steps to limit the promotion and use of Spanish. Major demographic shifts provide an explanation for the perceived rise in Latino social, political, and economic status, especially in states with large Hispanic populations. Cain, Citrin, and Wong. (2000) contend that: "What may matter is change in the ethnic composition of a neighborhood, the nature of the intergroup contacts and the economic status, cultural distinctiveness or political organization of minority group members" (p. 58).

Authors: Barker, Valerie. and Giles, Howard.
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Social Limitation Structural Equation Model 4
Results showed that opposition to bilingual education originated with both
prejudice and the perception of threat. Moreover, the authors discovered an overlap
between these two concepts that they found difficult to disentangle. Anglo opposition to
bilingual education was associated with living in a heavily Latino area, perceiving
educational conflict between Latinos and Anglo-Americans in terms of competition for
resources, and negative feelings toward Latinos. Interestingly, Anglos who lived in
Latino areas and could speak Spanish were as strongly opposed to bilingual education
programs as those who lived in these areas and could not speak Spanish. The authors
speculated that symbolic fears about the spread of Spanish might have fueled some of
the opposition to bilingual education programs.
Huddy and Sears (1995) argue that insecurity about social identity and English
language dominance among Whites may be regarded as "new racism" which
materializes as resentment about minority language use, competition for resources, and
affirmative action. However, dominant groups may feel a sense of threat not based on
objective fact but upon sheer supposition. Therefore, if Anglos believe that Spanish is
likely to overwhelm English (even if objective evidence suggests that it is not likely),
they may take steps to limit the promotion and use of Spanish.
Major demographic shifts provide an explanation for the perceived rise in Latino
social, political, and economic status, especially in states with large Hispanic
populations. Cain, Citrin, and Wong. (2000) contend that: "What may matter is change
in the ethnic composition of a neighborhood, the nature of the intergroup contacts and
the economic status, cultural distinctiveness or political organization of minority group
members" (p. 58).


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