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Beyond cultural boundary: An empirical study of the third culture theory
Unformatted Document Text:  Third Culture Theory 5 Casmir & Asuncion-Lande, 1989; Casmir, 1993; Starosta, 1991). According to Useeem, Donahue, and Useem (1963), the binational third culture can be defined as “the complex of patterns learned and shared by communities of men stemming from both a Western and a Non-Western society who regularly interact as they relate their societies thereof, in the physical setting of non-Western society” (p. 170). Casmir (1978) elaborated on this primitive notion to construct the following definition: Third culture perspective moves away from the study of established, identified individual component parts, or even systems, identified within participating cultures and nations, to a model which focuses on the situational and interactional communication processes between individuals from various nations or cultures. (p. 249) Casmir and Asuncion-Lande (1989) reached a more concise definition based on the previous definition: “a situational subculture wherein temporary behavioral adjustment can be made by the interacting persons as they attempts to reach a mutually agreed upon goal(s)” (p. 294). Contrasting the mechanical and closed system in which control and dominance prevails, Casmir (1978) saw the third culture as an open and adaptive model—a situational, supportive subculture or territory of mutuality. More systematic definition of the third culture was suggested by Casmir and Asuncion-Lande (1989): In the conjoining of their separate cultures, a third culture, more inclusive than the original ones, is created, which both of them now share. Third culture is not merely the result of the fusion of the two or more separate entities, but also the product of the harmonization of composite parts into a coherent whole. (p. 294)

Authors: Lee, Suman.
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Third Culture Theory
5
Casmir & Asuncion-Lande, 1989; Casmir, 1993; Starosta, 1991). According to Useeem,
Donahue, and Useem (1963), the binational third culture can be defined as “the complex
of patterns learned and shared by communities of men stemming from both a Western
and a Non-Western society who regularly interact as they relate their societies thereof, in
the physical setting of non-Western society” (p. 170). Casmir (1978) elaborated on this
primitive notion to construct the following definition:
Third culture perspective moves away from the study of established, identified
individual component parts, or even systems, identified within participating
cultures and nations, to a model which focuses on the situational and interactional
communication processes between individuals from various nations or cultures.
(p. 249)
Casmir and Asuncion-Lande (1989) reached a more concise definition based on
the previous definition: “a situational subculture wherein temporary behavioral
adjustment can be made by the interacting persons as they attempts to reach a mutually
agreed upon goal(s)” (p. 294). Contrasting the mechanical and closed system in which
control and dominance prevails, Casmir (1978) saw the third culture as an open and
adaptive model—a situational, supportive subculture or territory of mutuality. More
systematic definition of the third culture was suggested by Casmir and Asuncion-Lande
(1989):
In the conjoining of their separate cultures, a third culture, more inclusive than the
original ones, is created, which both of them now share. Third culture is not
merely the result of the fusion of the two or more separate entities, but also the
product of the harmonization of composite parts into a coherent whole. (p. 294)


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