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Robin Hoods or thieves? A Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies regarding software piracy
Unformatted Document Text:  Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies 17 as $150,000.00). BSA relies on “disgruntled employees to identify possible infringements and turn in their employers” (Berger, 2001, July 5). BSA claims these and similar offenses contributed to worldwide losses of more than $2.6 billion to the software industry in 2000. “Truce” programs similar to this have been conduced in Mexico, Thailand, the U.K., and Denmark. [In a mode of intimidation, BSA spokesperson Debbi Bauman is quoted by Berger as saying, “If an organization is not already under investigation by the BSA, they should take advantage of this.”] The BSA estimates one in every three business software applications was pirated in 2000, and argues the piracy problem signifies lost jobs, wages, tax revenues and a creates a potential barrier to innovation and product development. "Although the piracy rates in several regions and countries have decreased, software piracy continues to rob the global marketplace of hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions in wages and tax revenues," said Robert Holleyman, BSA’s president and CEO (as quoted in BSA, 2000, May 21). U.S. Customs Service called the group DrinkOrDie (DoD, a network of software crackers that was the focus of worldwide anti-piracy law enforcement action in December 2001; the group initially gained attention—and notoriety—by cracking Windows 95 before its release), as “the oldest and most well known” of Internet piracy organizations whose members “come from all walks of life. Many are successful white-collar business people by day, and DrinkOrDie members by night,” the Customs Service said (as quoted in Manjoo, 2001, Dec 13, pg. ??). But critics of these efforts state, “Even if DoD is knocked out completely, every application and every game will still be cracked and distributed within 48 hours of release” (Manjoo, 2001, Dec 13). DoD was founded in Moscow in

Authors: Malyshev, Yuri. and Hamilton, Ann.
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Foucauldian analysis of international trade policies 17
as $150,000.00). BSA relies on “disgruntled employees to identify possible infringements
and turn in their employers” (Berger, 2001, July 5). BSA claims these and similar offenses
contributed to worldwide losses of more than $2.6 billion to the software industry in 2000.
“Truce” programs similar to this have been conduced in Mexico, Thailand, the U.K., and
Denmark. [In a mode of intimidation, BSA spokesperson Debbi Bauman is quoted by
Berger as saying, “If an organization is not already under investigation by the BSA, they
should take advantage of this.”]
The BSA estimates one in every three business software applications was pirated in
2000, and argues the piracy problem signifies lost jobs, wages, tax revenues and a creates a
potential barrier to innovation and product development. "Although the piracy rates in
several regions and countries have decreased, software piracy continues to rob the global
marketplace of hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions in wages and tax revenues," said
Robert Holleyman, BSA’s president and CEO (as quoted in BSA, 2000, May 21).
U.S. Customs Service called the group DrinkOrDie (DoD, a network of software
crackers that was the focus of worldwide anti-piracy law enforcement action in December
2001; the group initially gained attention—and notoriety—by cracking Windows 95 before
its release), as “the oldest and most well known” of Internet piracy organizations whose
members “come from all walks of life. Many are successful white-collar business people
by day, and DrinkOrDie members by night,” the Customs Service said (as quoted in
Manjoo, 2001, Dec 13, pg. ??). But critics of these efforts state, “Even if DoD is knocked
out completely, every application and every game will still be cracked and distributed
within 48 hours of release” (Manjoo, 2001, Dec 13). DoD was founded in Moscow in


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